Genetics Honors   (#2000440)


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Course Number: 2000440

Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Science > SubSubject: Biological Sciences >

Course Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses

Abbreviated Title: GENETICS HON

Honors? Yes

 

Number of Credits: One credit (1)

Course Length: Year (Y)

Course Type: Core

Course Level: 3

Course Status : State Board Approved

 

Keywords: PreK to 12 Education, Pre K to 12 Education, Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education, 9 to 12, 9-12, High School, Science, Biological Sciences, Genetics, GENETICS

 

Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Information:

 

Related Standards

Integrate Florida Standards for Mathematical Practice (MP) as applicable.

  • MACC.K12.MP.1.1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • MACC.K12.MP.2.1 Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • MACC.K12.MP.3.1 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • MACC.K12.MP.4.1 Model with mathematics.
  • MACC.K12.MP.5.1 Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • MACC.K12.MP.6.1 Attend to precision.
  • MACC.K12.MP.7.1 Look for and make use of structure.
  • MACC.K12.MP.8.1 Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

 

Name

Description

SC.912.N.1.1:

Define a problem based on a specific  body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following: 

  1. Pose questions about the natural world, (Articulate the purpose of the investigation and identify the relevant scientific concepts).
  2. Conduct systematic observations, (Write procedures that are clear and replicable. Identify observables and examine relationships between test (independent) variable and outcome (dependent) variable. Employ appropriate methods for accurate and consistent observations; conduct and record measurements at appropriate levels of precision. Follow safety guidelines).
  3. Examine books and other sources of information to see what is already known,
  4. Review what is known in light of empirical evidence, (Examine whether available empirical evidence can be interpreted in terms of existing knowledge and models, and if not, modify or develop new models).
  5. Plan investigations, (Design and evaluate a scientific investigation).
  6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs), (Collect data or evidence in an organized way. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration, technique, maintenance, and storage).
  7. Pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of events,
  8. Generate explanations that explicate or describe natural phenomena (inferences),
  9. Use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify these explanations to others,
  10. Communicate results of scientific investigations, and
  11. Evaluate the merits of the explanations produced by others.

Remarks/Examples:

Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Connections for 6-12 Literacy in Science

For Students in Grades 9-10

LACC.910.RST.1.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.

LACC.910.RST.1.3   Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.

LACC.910.RST.3.7 Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.

LACC.910.WHST.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

LACC.910.WHST.3.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

For Students in Grades 11-12

LACC.1112.RST.1.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.

LACC.1112.RST.1.3 Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.

LACC.1112.RST.3.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

LACC.1112.WHST.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

LACC.1112.WHST.3.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Connections for Mathematical Practices

MACC.K12.MP.1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

MACC.K12.MP.2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

MACC.K12.MP.3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. [Viable arguments include evidence.]

MACC.K12.MP.4: Model with mathematics.

MACC.K12.MP.5: Use appropriate tools strategically.

MACC.K12.MP.6: Attend to precision.

MACC.K12.MP.7: Look for and make use of structure.

MACC.K12.MP.8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

SC.912.N.1.2:

Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.

Remarks/Examples:
Science is characterized by empirical observations, testable questions, formation of hypotheses, and experimentation that results in stable and replicable results, logical reasoning, and coherent theoretical constructs.

CCSS Connections: MACC.K12.MP.3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

SC.912.N.2.1:

Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).

Remarks/Examples:
Science is the systematic and organized inquiry that is derived from observations and experimentation that can be verified or tested by further investigation to explain natural phenomena (e.g. Science is testable, pseudo-science is not science seeks falsifications, pseudo-science seeks confirmations.)

SC.912.N.2.2:

Identify which questions can be answered through science and which questions are outside the boundaries of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and religion.

Remarks/Examples:
Identify scientific questions that can be disproved by experimentation/testing. Recognize that pseudoscience is a claim, belief, or practice which is presented as scientific, but does not adhere to strict standards of science (e.g. controlled variables, sample size, replicability, empirical and measurable evidence, and the concept of falsification).

CCSS Connections: MACC.K12.MP.3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

SC.912.N.3.5:

Describe the function of models in science, and identify the wide range of models used in science.

Remarks/Examples:
Describe how models are used by scientists to explain observations of nature.

CCSS Connections: MACC.K12.MP.4: Model with mathematics.

SC.912.P.12.12:

Explain how various factors, such as concentration, temperature, and presence of a catalyst affect the rate of a chemical reaction.

Remarks/Examples:

Various factors could include:  temperature, pressure, solvent and/or solute concentration, sterics, surface area, and catalysts. The rate of reaction is determined by the activation energy, and the pathway of the reaction can be shorter in the presence of enzymes or catalysts. Examples may include: decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using manganese (IV) oxide nitration of benzene using concentrated sulfuric acid hydrogenation of a C=C double bond using nickel.

SC.912.L.15.8:

Describe the scientific explanations of the origin of life on Earth.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.N.1.3, SC.912.N.1.4, and SC.912.N.2.1.

SC.912.L.15.9:

Explain the role of reproductive isolation in the process of speciation.

SC.912.L.15.12:

List the conditions for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in a population and why these conditions are not likely to appear in nature. Use the Hardy-Weinberg equation to predict genotypes in a population from observed phenotypes.

SC.912.L.15.13:

Describe the conditions required for natural selection, including: overproduction of offspring, inherited variation, and the struggle to survive, which result in differential reproductive success.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.L.15.14, SC.912.L.15.15, and SC.912.N.1.3.

SC.912.L.15.14:

Discuss mechanisms of evolutionary change other than natural selection such as genetic drift and gene flow.

SC.912.L.15.15:

Describe how mutation and genetic recombination increase genetic variation.

SC.912.L.16.1:

Use Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment to analyze patterns of inheritance.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.L.16.2.

SC.912.L.16.2:

Discuss observed inheritance patterns caused by various modes of inheritance, including dominant, recessive, codominant, sex-linked, polygenic, and multiple alleles.

SC.912.L.16.9:

Explain how and why the genetic code is universal and is common to almost all organisms.

SC.912.L.16.3:

Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to the transmission and conservation of the genetic information.

Remarks/Examples:

Integrate HE.912.C.1.7. Analyze how heredity and family history can impact personal health. Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.L.16.4 SC.912.L.16.5 SC.912.L.16.9.

SC.912.L.16.4:

Explain how mutations in the DNA sequence may or may not result in phenotypic change. Explain how mutations in gametes may result in phenotypic changes in offspring.

SC.912.L.16.5:

Explain the basic processes of transcription and translation, and how they result in the expression of genes.

SC.912.L.16.6:

Discuss the mechanisms for regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcription and translation level.

SC.912.L.16.7:

Describe how viruses and bacteria transfer genetic material between cells and the role of this process in biotechnology.

SC.912.L.16.8:

Explain the relationship between mutation, cell cycle, and uncontrolled cell growth potentially resulting in cancer.

Remarks/Examples:

Integrate HE.912.C.1.7. Analyze how heredity and family history can impact personal health.

SC.912.L.16.10:

Evaluate the impact of biotechnology on the individual, society and the environment, including medical and ethical issues.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC.

SC.912.L.16.11:

Discuss the technologies associated with forensic medicine and DNA identification, including restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

SC.912.L.16.12:

Describe how basic DNA technology (restriction digestion by endonucleases, gel electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, ligation, and transformation) is used to construct recombinant DNA molecules (DNA cloning).

SC.912.L.16.14:

Describe the cell cycle, including the process of mitosis. Explain the role of mitosis in the formation of new cells and its importance in maintaining chromosome number during asexual reproduction.

SC.912.L.16.16:

Describe the process of meiosis, including independent assortment and crossing over. Explain how reduction division results in the formation of haploid gametes or spores.

SC.912.L.16.17:

Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis and relate to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.L.16.8 SC.912.L.16.14 SC.912.L.16.16.

SC.912.L.17.1:

Discuss the characteristics of populations, such as number of individuals, age structure, density, and pattern of distribution.

Remarks/Examples:
CCSS Connections: MACC.K12.MP.7: Look for and make use of structure.

SC.912.L.17.8:

Recognize the consequences of the losses of biodiversity due to catastrophic events, climate changes, human activity, and the introduction of invasive, non-native species.

SC.912.L.18.1:

Describe the basic molecular structures and primary functions of the four major categories of biological macromolecules.

Remarks/Examples:

Annually assessed on Biology EOC. Also assesses SC.912.L.18.11.

SC.912.L.18.11:

Explain the role of enzymes as catalysts that lower the activation energy of biochemical reactions. Identify factors, such as pH and temperature, and their effect on enzyme activity.

MACC.912.N-Q.1.1:

Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

Remarks/Examples:
Algebra 1, Unit 1: Working with quantities and the relationships between them provides grounding for work with expressions, equations, and functions.

MACC.912.N-Q.1.3:

Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

Remarks/Examples:
Algebra 1, Unit 1: Working with quantities and the relationships between them provides grounding for work with expressions, equations, and functions.

MACC.912.F-IF.2.4:

For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity.

Remarks/Examples:
Algebra 1, Unit 2: For F.IF.4 and 5, focus on linear and exponential functions.

Algebra 1 Assessment Limits and Clarifications

i) Tasks have a real-world context. ii) Tasks are limited to linear functions, quadratic functions, square root functions, cube root functions, piecewise-defined functions (including step functions and absolute value functions), and exponential functions with domains in the integers.

Compare note (ii) with standard F-IF.7. The function types listed here are the same as those listed in the Algebra I column for standards F-IF.6 and F-IF.9.

Algebra 2 Assessment Limits and Clarifications

i) Tasks have a real-world context
ii) Tasks may involve polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

Compare note (ii) with standard F-IF.7. The function types listed here are the same as those listed in the Algebra II column for standards F-IF.6 and F-IF.9.

MACC.912.F-IF.3.7:

MACC.912.F-IF.3.7 (2013-2014): Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.

  1. Graph linear and quadratic functions and show intercepts, maxima, and minima.
  2. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions.
  3. Graph polynomial functions, identifying zeros when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior.
  4. Graph rational functions, identifying zeros and asymptotes when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior.
  5. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude.

MAFS.912.F-IF.3.7 (2014-2015): Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.

  1. Graph linear and quadratic functions and show intercepts, maxima, and minima. 
  2. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions. 
  3. Graph polynomial functions, identifying zeros when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  4. Graph rational functions, identifying zeros and asymptotes when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  5. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude, and using phase shift.

Remarks/Examples:
Algebra 1, Unit 2: For F.IF.7a, 7e, and 9 focus on linear and exponentials functions. Include comparisons of two functions presented algebraically. For example, compare the growth of two linear functions, or two exponential functions such as y=3n and y=1002

MACC.912.G-MG.1.2:

Apply concepts of density based on area and volume in modeling situations (e.g., persons per square mile, BTUs per cubic foot).

MACC.912.S-ID.1.1:

Represent data with plots on the real number line (dot plots, histograms, and box plots).

Remarks/Examples:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

MACC.912.S-ID.1.2:

Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread (interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets.

Remarks/Examples:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

MACC.912.S-ID.1.3:

Interpret differences in shape, center, and spread in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of extreme data points (outliers).

Remarks/Examples:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

MACC.912.S-ID.1.4:

Use the mean and standard deviation of a data set to fit it to a normal distribution and to estimate population percentages. Recognize that there are data sets for which such a procedure is not appropriate. Use calculators, spreadsheets, and tables to estimate areas under the normal curve.

MACC.912.S-ID.2.5:

Summarize categorical data for two categories in two-way frequency tables. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data (including joint, marginal, and conditional relative frequencies). Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.

MACC.912.S-ID.2.6:

Represent data on two quantitative variables on a scatter plot, and describe how the variables are related.

  1. Fit a function to the data; use functions fitted to data to solve problems in the context of the data. Use given functions or choose a function suggested by the context. Emphasize linear, and exponential models.
  2. Informally assess the fit of a function by plotting and analyzing residuals.
  3. Fit a linear function for a scatter plot that suggests a linear association.

 

Remarks/Examples:
Students take a more sophisticated look at using a linear function to model the relationship between two numerical variables. In addition to fitting a line to data, students assess how well the model fits by analyzing residuals.

S.ID.6b should be focused on linear models, but may be used to preview quadratic functions in Unit 5 of this course.

Algebra 1 Assessment Limits and Clarifications

i) Tasks have a real-world context.
ii) Exponential functions are limited to those with domains in the integers.

Algebra 2 Assessment Limits and Clarifications

i) Tasks have a real-world context.
ii) Tasks are limited to exponential functions with domains not in the integers and trigonometric functions.

MACC.912.S-IC.2.6:

Evaluate reports based on data.

LACC.1112.SL.1.1:

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

LACC.1112.SL.1.2:

Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

LACC.1112.SL.1.3:

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

LACC.1112.SL.2.4:

Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

LACC.1112.SL.2.5:

Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

LACC.1112.RST.1.1:

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.

LACC.1112.RST.1.2:

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

LACC.1112.RST.1.3:

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.

LACC.1112.RST.2.4:

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.

LACC.1112.RST.2.5:

Analyze how the text structures information or ideas into categories or hierarchies, demonstrating understanding of the information or ideas.

LACC.1112.RST.2.6:

Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.

LACC.1112.RST.3.7:

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

LACC.1112.RST.3.8:

Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.

LACC.1112.RST.3.9:

Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

LACC.1112.RST.4.10:

By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

LACC.1112.WHST.1.1:

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

LACC.1112.WHST.1.2:

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

LACC.1112.WHST.2.4:

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

LACC.1112.WHST.2.5:

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

LACC.1112.WHST.2.6:

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

LACC.1112.WHST.3.7:

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

LACC.1112.WHST.3.8:

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

LACC.1112.WHST.3.9:

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

LACC.1112.WHST.4.10:

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

HE.912.C.1.3:

Evaluate how environment and personal health are interrelated.

Remarks/Examples:
Food options within a community; prenatal-care services; availability of recreational facilities; air quality; weather-safety awareness; and weather, air, and water conditions.

HE.912.C.1.7:

Analyze how heredity and family history can impact personal health.

Remarks/Examples:
Drug use, family obesity, heart disease, mental health, and non-communicable illness or disease.

 

Related Resources

Lesson Plan

Name

Description

Oat Seed Lab - A Model Experiment:

Seeds are germinated in a particular environment, in the first week of the lesson, during an intensive introduction to the Nature of Science. Concurrent with that introduction, students record their daily measurements, process those data (graphically and statistically), and prepare a formal report, using sample reports as a model. The lesson will introduce the use of a simple statistical tool (t-test) to measure significant differences. Although the activity is simple and straightforward, it is most appropriate for students who are learning the appropriate way to collect data and conduct a statistical analysis of data.

Defining Problems and Planning Investigations:

This lesson, if well planned out and conducted properly, addresses every component of the benchmark it is intended to cover. It involves a whole-group segment, during which the teacher provides a demonstration for students to observe. It also involves a segment that requires the students consult other sources of information related to what they observed in making their hypothesis and planning their investigation. It also involves a group-learning segment, that can easily be adjusted to incorporate differentiated instruction to accommodate students with special needs, during which students conduct the investigation they planned. Finally, it also involves a segment that allows the students the opportunity to communicate the results of their investigation and to evaluate the results of investigations conducted by others. It may also involve another segment involving direct instruction of the components of the scientific method and practice opportunities for students to develop their understanding of these components if this is determined to be necessary based upon the results of the pre-lesson Laws, and electricity in physics. They also lend themselves well to crystalline structures, heat of reaction, and bonding in chemistry. In addition, students could study applications for the materials in the medical and space industries.

Behavior of Gases: Disaster at Lake Nyos:

Students, through discussion and structured inquiry, will learn about the behavior of gases under various conditions. Students will be able to apply these concepts to everyday objects such as soda bottles, fire extinguishers, hot air balloons, propane tanks, and aerosol products.

How Effective is Regeneration in a Planarian? A Comparative Study:

In this investigation students will examine the regeneration of a planaria based on their incisions. Students will design their own lab based on their initial research.
They will note the changes each day of their specimen, collecting qualitative and quantitative data including using digital microscope software. They will compile data as a team and a class to determine the outcomes. In the final phase of this project students will create a multimedia presentation to summarize and present their findings.

Corn Conundrum:

The Corn Conundrum MEA provides students with an agricultural problem in which they must work as a team to develop a procedure to select the best variety of corn to grow under drier conditions predicted by models of global climate change. Students must determine the most important factors that make planting crops sustainable in restricted climate conditions for the client. The main focus of this MEA is manipulating factors relating to plant biology, including transpiration and photosynthesis.

Investigating the pH of Soils:

In this activity students will conduct research then test the effects of adding products to soil. Students will learn about soil pH, what factors affect the pH of soil and how important it is to the growth of plants. Students will learn to use reputable resources to support their findings. Students will be expected to write a detailed lab report that thoroughly explores the concept while integrating the data from their investigation.

Conductors vs. Insulators: An Inquiry Lab:

This is a basic introduction to the difference between conductors and insulators when either is placed into a series circuit with a battery and a light bulb. This introductory activity is primarily used as a vehicle for students to better understand how to write a lab report with the appropriate sections and to integrate technology through Google Docs and a virtual lab simulation.

Camouflage in the Ocean:

In this lesson, students will complete two mini-labs to explore how colors change as you descend in an aquatic environment. Based on their observations they are challenged to design a camouflage pattern which could be used below the upper, sun-lit portions of the ocean, AND defend their design decisions in written form.

Distance and Displacement.:

  • In this lesson students, will be able to identify frames of reference and describe how they are used to measure motion.
  • Identify appropriate SI units for measuring distances.
  • Distinguish between distance and displacement.
  • Calculate displacement using vector addition.

Of Sunsets, Souls and Senses :

Explores the realm and limits of science. Engages students to give examples of topics that can be studied by science, and those that cannot. This also takes a look at descriptive terms that reflect the true nature of modern science, and those that do not, especially those that do not fit the popular perceptions of science.

Personal DNA Testing:

A lesson with multi-media components from PBS/NOVA that focuses on DNA testing, including techniques, purposes, and considerations for biotechnology and human decisions regarding health. Students will learn about single nucleotide polymorphisms, how they are used in science, and how they are being used in the medical field. Students will apply this knowledge by looking at a mock data set and probabilities to inform medical recommendations.

Can You Read My Mind?:

This engaging activity is a fun game requiring a teacher to team up with a student and provide insider information before the activity begins. The team will cleverly involve the rest of the class in a guessing game where students must apply logic and their understanding of variables to devise questions aimed at figuring out the trick, which allows the chosen student and the teacher to always know what the other is thinking! The concept of changing one variable at a time is critical to making progress in this game of reasoning and observation.

HOW'S YOUR HOROSCOPE?:

Is astrology a science, pseudoscience, or a non-science? A major premise of astrology is that one's birth sign correlates with a particular collection of personality traits and interests. In order to test that premise, students compare their own traits with standard astrological descriptions, then learn whether their actual birthday matches the corresponding astrological dates. Simple statistical calculations reveal likely results due to chance. Discussion explores various explanations for results matching expectations for chance alone, and for results which do not match. The reasons that astrology is a pseudoscience are also examined.

How Do Meteorologists Forecast the Weather?:

This is a lesson that I developed where students learn how meteorologists predict the weather. Students will use surface weather maps, radar, satellite, and weather models from the National Weather Service to assess the current state of the weather and make a prediction.

Cleaning Up Your Act:

Cleaning Up Your Act Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) provides students with a real world engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best material for cleaning up an oil spill. The main focus of this MEA is to recognize the consequences of a catastrophic event, and understand the environmental and economical impact based on data analysis. Students will conduct individual and team investigations in order to arrive at a scientifically sound solution to the problem.

Temperature, Volume, and Rate of Reaction:

This one-two day lab will allow students to collect data on temperature, volume, and rate for a reaction in a closed system. Heat speeds up the reaction, altering both volume and rate due to an increase in energy. Students will be able to graph their own lab group's data and compile class data if Google docs is available. They can then look at correlations between temperature, volume, and rate of reaction.

Chemical Reaction Rates: Inquiry on Affecting Factors:

Chemical reaction rates can differ when different factors are present. The lesson focuses on the main rate changing contributors: temperature, concentration, surface area, and catalysts. Students are intended to learn through several inquiry based lab stations with minimal teacher guidance. The labs are of thought and observational base with little complexity in construction.

Evolution by Natural Selection:

Principles of natural selection are demonstrated by a simulation involving different color pompoms on different color and texture habitats and student feeders equipped with different types of feeding implement. Students learn how different adaptations contribute to differences in survival and reproductive success, which results in changing frequencies of genotypes in the populations.

Introduction to Natural Selection:

To develop an understanding of natural selection, specifically, how it unfolds from generation to generation.

Island Biogeography:

Students will study the concept of speciation and predict an island habitat's biodiversity based on the island's size and distance from the mainland.

Identifying Misconceptions on Natural Selection:

In this lesson, students will take a short inventory on Natural Selection where they will be asked to read short passages and answer questions based on the Theory of Natural Selection. By comparing answers the students gave, the teacher will be able to identify common misconceptions they have on the Theory of Evolution.

Dragon Genetics:

In this lab, Dragon Genetics: Principles of Mendelian Genetics, students learn the principles of Mendelian genetics by using Popsicle sticks, each of which represents a pair of homologous chromosomes with multiple genetic traits. Pairs of students use their sets of Popsicle sticks to represent a mating and then identify the genetic makeup and phenotypic traits of the resulting baby dragon.

Genotype and Phenotype Activity:

This is a hands-on activity that will help students distinguish between genotype and phenotype.

Mendelian Genetics:

A full lesson plan on teaching Mendelian Genetics and how to use and understand punnett squares.

The Wolfman Syndrome:

This clicker case uses congenital generalized hypertrichosis (CGH), a rare genetic disease, to teach students the basic principles of Mendelian inheritance.

Students watch a video clip from an ABC News interview that introduces them to Danny Gomez, a circus performer with the Mexican international Circus. Danny and several other family members of his family have a condition called hypertrichosis-excessive hair growth in areas of the body that is not predominately androgen dependent. In the process of meeting Danny and his family, students learn basic genetic concepts including DNA organization, karyotype analysis, dominance and recessive patterns of inheritance, sex linkage, and lyonization, as well as a brief introduction to the evolutionary idea of atavism.

Bird Brains - Evolutionary Relationships:

Students will compare the sequence of amino acids in a gene shared between humans and six other organisms and infer evolutionary relationships among the species.

CRACKING THE CODE/CLONING PAPER PLASMID:

This is an activity where students "crack" the genetic code. They will "read" and "write" a message. They will also participate in "cloning" a plasmid.

Tissue Specific Gene Expression:

How is it that all cells in our body have the same genes, yet cells in different tissues express different genes? A basic notion in biology that most high school students fail to conceptualize is the fact that all cells in the animal or human body contain the same DNA, yet different cells in different tissues express, on the one hand, a set of common genes, and on the other, express another set of genes that vary depending on the type of tissue and the stage of development. In this video lesson, the student will be reminded that genes in a cell/tissue are expressed when certain conditions in the nucleus are met. Interestingly, the system utilized by the cell to ensure tissue specific gene expression is rather simple. Among other factors - all discussed fully in the lesson - the cells make use of a tiny scaffold known as the "Nuclear Matrix or Nucleo-Skeleton". This video lesson spans 20 minutes and provides 5 exercises for students to work out in groups and in consultation with their classroom teacher. The entire duration of the video demonstration and exercises should take about 45-50 minutes, or equivalent to one classroom session. There are no supplies needed for students' participation in the provided exercises. They will only need their notebooks and pens. However, the teacher may wish to emulate the demonstrations used in the video lesson by the presenter and in this case simple material can be used as those used in the video. These include play dough, pencils, rubber bands (to construct the nuclear matrix model), a tennis ball and 2-3 Meters worth of shoe laces. The students should be aware of basic information about DNA folding in the nucleus, DNA replication, gene transcription, translation and protein synthesis.

DNA Replication with Codon Bingo:

This DNA Replication Lesson Plan incorporates several types of instructional strategies to reach all students. These strategies include:

  1. Demonstrations
  2. Discussions
  3. Cooperative learning
  4. Brainstorming
  5. Stimulations
  6. Inquiry Based activity
  7. Projects
  8. Game
  9. Cooperative Learning
  10. Self DNA, students try to develop the next Super Hero.

The King of Dinosaurs or a Chicken Dinner?:

This lesson uses the fundamentals of protein synthesis as a context for investigating the closest living relative to Tyrannosaurus rex and evaluating whether or not paleontologist and dinosaur expert, Jack Horner, will be able to "create" live dinosaurs in the lab. The first objective is for students to be able to access and properly utilize the NIH's protein sequence database to perform a BLAST, using biochemical evidence to determine T rex's closest living relative. The second objective is for students to be able to explain and evaluate Jack Horner's plans for creating live dinosaurs in the lab. The main prerequisite for the lesson is a basic understanding of protein synthesis, or the flow of information in the cell from DNA to RNA during transcription and then from RNA to protein during translation. You will find downloadable handouts of the necessary documents for the lesson. To complete the lesson, you will need the handouts and ideally computers with Internet connections so that students can complete the BLAST on their own or in groups. The computers are not a requirement, however, because the video has an optional segment that goes through the BLAST step-by-step and shows students exactly what they would see if they were doing it themselves. There is an optional reading assignment from WIRED magazine at the close of the lesson, and the article can be accessed for free on-line at http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/09/ff_chickensaurus/. The lesson should take somewhere around 90 minutes, a portion of which is group or classroom discussion based on prompts from the video or the handouts.

Pandemic Flu:

In this lesson, students will model an avian-human flu virus structure, replication, and spread. The accompanying PBS NOVA movie Pandemic Flu regarding H5N1 Avian and Swine Flu highlights interactions between the virus, humans, and birds.

Killer Microbe:

A lesson about the important topic of antibiotic-resistant bacteria with student activities and A/V resources.

Profile: Judah Folkman Cancer Research:

This PBS/NOVA lesson combines a discussion of the Nature of Science using a renowned Cancer researcher (and supported by the profiles of several other renowned scientists in the activities) to study concepts of creativity and tentativeness in the Nature of Science with a study of the biological characteristics of cells in disease (cancer).

Cancer: Cells Make Mistakes Too!:

Students will practice reading in the content area and answer questions regarding cancer and how it spreads.

From Teenage to Old Age: How Cancer Develops Over Time:

This lesson focuses on: how cancer is caused by mutations that accumulate over time in cells' DNA, how the genes mutated in cancer are involved in normal cell growth & division, and how different types of mutations affect the functions of these genes. We recommend that this lesson be the first BLOSSOMS lesson on cancer, that the students use, from the series of three cancer lessons made by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. It would be helpful if the students already knew basic information about DNA structure & function, and how mutations can affect the RNA & protein encoded by this DNA. Only paper and writing utensils, and the ability to print out or display the provided handouts, are necessary to complete this lesson. This lesson is intended to take one or two class periods. The two most central hands-on activities in the lesson are as follows:

  • Students do an activity with a “mutation mat” (which is much like a bingo board) that shows how mutations accumulate in cells over time. This activity demonstrates why cancer is a disease of old age, because the more years that pass, the higher the chance that enough mutations have occurred in the relevant genes in a single cell, to cause it to become a cancer cell.
  • Students complete a worksheet about various examples of “mutations” that could affect a steam engine train and cause it to barrel out of control (for example: if the train’s brakes aren’t working, or if the coal shovelers are shoveling too quickly). 

The lesson ends with two additional discussion topics: how a person can be pre-disposed to cancer if he/she inherits a mutation from his/her parents; and how different tissues in the body get exposed to different mutagens, thus causing different types of cancer.

Cancer as a Multistep Process:

This lesson is the third in a series, preceded by "The Faces of Cancer" and "Cancer and the Cell Cycle." In this lesson, students use random number tables and an Internet-based simulation to test several hypotheses about the development of cancer.

After completing this activity, students will:

  • understand that cancer results from the accumulation of genetic damage to cells across time, and
  • be able to explain the increase in cancer incidence that occurs with an increase in age in terms of a multiple hit (mutations in a number of genes) hypothesis for cancer's development.

Acting on Information About Cancer:

Students assume the roles of federal legislators and explore several Cell Biology and Cancer website resources to identify reasons to support or oppose a proposed statute that would require individuals under the age of 18 to wear protective clothing when outdoors.

After completing this activity, students will:

  • understand that science can help us improve personal and public health,
  • be able to explain that good choices can reduce an individual's risk of developing cancer and can improve an individual's chance of survival if he or she does develop it,
  • understand that ethics brings to public policy debates two presumptions: that we should protect individual autonomy and that we should protect individual and societal health and well-being,
  • recognize that ethical values sometimes conflict in public policy debates about strategies for reducing the risk of cancer, and
  • understand that it is possible for people to hold different positions on a controversial topic and still participate in a reasoned discussion about it.

Genetically Modified Foods:

Using short videos, articles and a scavenger hunt, students will learn the process of genetically modifying crops and understand the benefits and drawbacks of genetically modified foods.

How to be a Molecular Biologist the Easy Way:

This lesson plan details the ethical concepts of biotechnology and allows students to explore basic concepts of manipulating and analyzing DNA in a classroom setting. The lesson takes the students through a discussion of controversial topics related to molecular biology and biotechnology, DNA isolation, restriction digestion of DNA, gel electrophoresis, and DNA cloning.

Cells on Stage:

The lesson addresses the phases of the cell cycle and mitosis through live acting

From Cell to DNA:

The goal of this lesson is to introduce students to the human cell and its DNA as the genetic information that governs how the cell will function.

Applied mitosis and meiosis: plant biotechnology:

Students will learn about sexual and asexual reproduction and relate each to the process of mitosis and meiosis within the context of plant biotechnology

The Human Population Growth Rate:

Just how quickly is the world's human population growing? In the US and other developed countries, the current growth rate is slow compared to some developing countries where it is speeding up. There are factors that slowed down this growth rate and there are similar factors that actually speed it up. Discussing and explaining the factors that determine the fluctuation in growth rate.

The US population growth between 1950 - 2000 is 7.5 times slower than that of India. In 1950 the US had a population of 80 million which increased every ten years with 1 million.

Invasive Species:

This resource provides a lesson plan, a student assignment, and a power point presentation on invasive species with examples.

Coral Reefs in Acid - What is Ocean Acidification?:

The goal of this lesson plan is for students to be able to conduct mini-experiments that demonstrate what ocean acidification is and how it affects marine organisms. Students will perform mini-experiments and observe diagrams to help generate a definition of what ocean acidification is, why it is occurring, and how humans can reduce their impact.

Preserving Our Marine Ecosystems:

The focus of this MEA is oil spills and their effect on the environment. In this activity, students from a fictitious class are studying about the effects of an oil spill on marine ecosystems and have performed an experiment in which they were asked to try to rid a teaspoon of corn oil from a baking pan filled with two liters of water as thoroughly as possible in a limited timeframe and with limited resources. By examining, analyzing, and evaluating experimental data related to resource usage, disposal, and labor costs, students must face the tradeoffs that are involved in trying to preserve an ecosystem when time, money, and resources are limited.

Florida Panthers and Wildlife Corridors:

Students will learn about the Florida Panther, threats to it's survival and the role of wildlife corridors as an attempt to reduce roadway fatalities. Students will participate in a game simulating panther crossings, learn about panthers from a guest speaker or teacher, and participate in a mock town hall meeting evaluating the construction of wildlife corridors.

Macromolecule Food Indicator Lab:

In this lesson students will complete a lab using indicators to determine which foods contain carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and/or starches. The lab includes pre-lab questions, discussion, lab experimentation, post lab questions, results and conclusion. The students will submit a completed lab report that will be graded based on a Law of Motion. Upon being provided with textbooks, rulers, measuring tapes, mini-storage containers, golf balls, marbles, rubber balls, steel balls, and pennies they work cooperatively to implement and revise their hypotheses. With limited guidance from the teacher, students are able to visualize the direct relationships between force and mass; force and acceleration; and the inverse relationship between mass and acceleration.

Ramp It Up:

Using inquiry techniques, students, working in groups, are asked to design and conduct experiments to test the Law of Conservation of Energy and the Law of Conservation of Momentum. Upon being provided with textbooks, rulers, measuring tapes, stopwatches, mini-storage containers, golf balls, marbles, rubber balls, steel balls, and pennies, they work cooperatively to implement and revise their hypotheses. With limited guidance from the teacher, students are able to visualize the relationships between mass, velocity, height, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, and total energy as well as the relationships between mass, velocity, and momentum.

How Fast do Objects Fall?:

Students will investigate falling objects with very low air friction.

Acceleration:

In this lesson students will learn to:

  1. Identify changes in motion that produce acceleration.
  2. Describe examples of objects moving with constant acceleration.
  3. Calculate the acceleration of an object, analytically, and graphically.
  4. Interpret velocity-time graph, and explain the meaning of the slope.
  5. Classify acceleration as positive, negative, and zero.
  6. Describe instantaneous acceleration.

BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 - FORCES:

This lesson is designed to be part of a sequence of lessons. It follows resource 52937 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 MOTION" and precedes resource 52910 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 MECHANICAL ENERGY". This lesson uses a predict, observe, and explain approach along with inquiry based activities to enhance student understanding of Newton's three laws of motion.

BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 - STATES OF MATTER:

This lesson is designed to be part of a sequence of lessons. It follows CPALMS Resource #52957 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE-THERMAL ENERGY" and precedes CPALMS Resource #52961 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE-SOLUTIONS." The lesson employs a predict, observe, explain approach along with inquiry-based activities to enhance student understanding of states of matter and phase changes in terms of the kinetic molecular theory.

BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 - MECHANICAL ENERGY:

This lesson is designed to be part of a sequence of lessons. It follows resource 52648 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 FORCES" and precedes resource 52957 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 THERMAL ENERGY". This lesson uses a predict, observe, and explain approach along with inquiry based activities to enhance student understanding of the conservation of energy.

BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 - Thermal Energy:

This lesson is designed to be part of a sequence of lessons. It follows resource 52910 "BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 Mechanical Energy" and precedes resource 52705"BIOSCOPES SUMMER INSTITUTE 2013 States of Matter". This lesson uses a predict, observe, and explain approach along with inquiry based activities to enhance student understanding of thermal energy and specific heat.

Making Menus:

Students can organize information about a chemical substance into a menu that will help them establish their thoughts when converting using the concept of the mole. Ordering off their menu narrows the information to only what is relevant and allows them to easily set up factor label conversions.

Shopping for a Home Mortgage Loan:

Students will analyze the data given to decide which type of loan they will buy. After selecting their options, students will estimate the first loan payment. FHA loans offer a better interest rate than conforming loans, but buying premium insurance is a requirement to qualify for an FHA loan, increasing the upfront cost of the loan. Fixed interest rate loans seem like the best choice because you have the same mortgage payment every month; however, adjustable rate loans offer a better interest rate and it has a cap on the interest rate.

How high is that railing, anyway?:

This is a short activity where students are able to determine the height of an elevated railing by using the equations associated with freefall. This lesson may also be appropriate for analyzing graphs related to position/velocity/acceleration versus time.

Exponential Graphing Using Technology:

This lesson is teacher/student directed for discovering and translating exponential functions using a graphing app. The lesson focuses on the translations from a parent graph and how changing the coefficient, base and exponent values relate to the transformation.

Functions and Everyday Situations:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to articulate verbally the relationships between variables arising in everyday contexts, translate between everyday situations and sketch graphs of relationships between variables, interpret algebraic functions in terms of the contexts in which they arise and reflect on the domains of everyday functions and in particular whether they should be discrete or continuous.

Representing Polynomials:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to translate between graphs and algebraic representations of polynomials. In particular, this unit aims to help you identify and assist students who have difficulties in recognizing the connection between the zeros of polynomials when suitable factorizations are available, and graphs of the functions defined by polynomials as well as recognizing the connection between transformations of the graphs and transformations of the functions obtained by replacing f(x) by f(x + k), f(x) + k, -f(x), f(-x).

Ferris Wheel:

This lesson is intended to help you assess how well students are able to:

  • Model a periodic situation, the height of a person on a Ferris wheel, using trigonometric functions.
  • Interpret the constants a, b, c in the formula h = a + b cos ct in terms of the physical situation, where h is the height of the person above the ground and t is the elapsed time.

Cup-Activity: writing equations from data:

This is a great lab activity that allows students to develop a true understanding of slope as a rate of change. Students are active and involved and must use higher order thinking skills in order to answer questions. Students work through an activity, measuring heights of cups that are stacked. Students them determine a "rate of change - slope". Students are then asked to put this into slope-intercept form. The important part here is in their determining the y-intercept of the equation. Students then take this further and finally attempt to create a linear inequality to determine how many cups, stacked vertically, will fit under a table.

Parts and more Parts-- Parabola Fun:

This is an entry lesson into quadratic functions and their shapes. Students see many real-life representations of parabolas. This lesson provides important vocabulary associated with quadratic functions and their graphs in an interactive manner. Students create a foldable and complete a worksheet using their foldable notes.

Transforming Quadratics - The basics:

This lesson introduces students to the graph of the quadratic parent function. It provides a note taking sheet for students to organize their learning of basic transformations to the parent function. There is a "FUN" cut and paste activity for students to match graphs with verbal descriptions and their equations.

Graphing Quadratic Equations:

This is an introductory lesson to graphing quadratic equations. This lesson uses graphing technology to illustrate the differences between quadratic equations and linear equations. In addition, it allows students to identify important parts of the quadratic equation and how each piece changes the look of the graph.

Building Connections:

This learning activity guides students to make connections between linear and polynomial functions through exploring their graphs. This lesson plan is outlined with step-by-step directions for teachers to follow as well as guiding questions and

Predicting Your Financial Future:

The purpose of this lesson is to engage and excite students about financial investments, and to educate them about credit card and other debt.

Forming Quadratics:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to understand what the different algebraic forms of a quadratic function reveal about the properties of its graphical representation. In particular, the lesson will help you identify and help students who have the following difficulties in understanding how the factored form of the function can identify a graph's roots, how the completed square form of the function can identify a graph's maximum or minimum point, and how the standard form of the function can identify a graph's intercept.

Leap Frog Review Game:

In this lesson students will demonstrate their knowledge of limits, graphing, and exact trig limits evaluated using substitution. The students will play a game in which they evaluate their own knowledge of problems in the unit, as well as the teacher evaluation the mastery of the problems in the unit. The students receive immediate feedback on their own work and review while the teacher works the problems correcting any errors or misconceptions that the student had while working the problem. This lesson gives the student a power review of the concepts in the unit because the timing is determined by the teacher. All students are engaged and focused while playing this game. Giving students access to the PowerPoint of the game after the lesson provides a good study tool for the students.

Graphing Quadratics Made Easy: Vertex Form of the Equation:

This lesson covers quadratic translations as they relate to vertex form of a quadratic equation. Students will predict what will happen to the graph of a quadratic function when more than one constant is in a quadratic equation. Then, the students will graph quadratic equations in vertex form using their knowledge of the translations of a quadratic function, as well as describe the translations that occur. Students will also identify the parent function of any quadratic function as  left parenthesis x right parenthesis equal x to the power of 2.

Taming the Behavior of Polynomials:

This lesson will cover sketching the graphs of polynomials while in factored form without the use of a calculator.

Dancing Polynomials/Graph Me Baby:

Dancing Polynomials is designed to lead students from the understanding that the equation of a line produces a linear pattern to the realization that using an exponent greater than one will produce curvature in a graph and that further patterns emerge allowing students to predict what happens at the end of the graph. Using graphing calculators, students will examine the patterns that emerge to predict the end behavior of polynomial functions. They will experiment by manipulating equations superimposed onto landmarks in the shape of parabolas and polynomial functions. An end behavior song and dance, called "Graph Me Baby" will allow students to become graphs in order to physically understand the end behavior of the graph.

Olympic Snowboard Design:

This MEA requires students to design a custom snowboard for five Olympic athletes, taking into consideration how their height and weight affect the design elements of a snowboard. There are several factors that go into the design of a snowboard, and the students must use reasoning skills to determine which factors are more important and why, as well as what factors to eliminate or add based on the athlete's style and preferences. After the students have designed a board for each athlete, they will report their procedure and reasons for their decisions.

Representing Data 2: Using Box Plots:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to interpret data using frequency graphs and box plots. In particular, this unit aims to identify and help students who have difficulty figuring out the data points and spread of data from frequency graphs and box plots. It is advisable to use the first lesson in the unit, Representing Data 1: Frequency Graphs (32498), before this one.

Representing Data 1: Using Frequency Graphs:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to use frequency graphs to identify a range of measures, make sense of this data in a real-world context, and understand that a large number of data points allow a frequency graph to be approximated by a continuous distribution.

CollegeReview.com:

This is a model-eliciting activity where students have been asked by a new website, CollegeReview.com, to come up with a system to rank various colleges based on five categories; tuition cost, social life, athletics, education, city population and starting salary upon graduation.

A MEANingful Discussion about Central Tendency:

This is a discovery lesson to deepen the understanding of central tendency (mean, median) by posing relevant scenarios that students must examine and explore. It is the exploration of the salary negotiations for the Los Angeles Lakers and the use of a see-saw to physically model what the algorithm for an average truly finds. This will lead students to understand the pairing of the measures of central tendency and spread dictated by the shape of the distribution. A detailed explanation of the answers is provided with the guided discovery questions so that the teacher will be able to deepen student knowledge by eliciting the nuances of the information presented.

Devising a Measure for Correlation:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students understand the notion of correlation. In particular this unit aims to identify and help students who have difficulty in understanding correlation as the degree of fit between two variables, making a mathematical model of a situation, testing and improving the model, communicating their reasoning clearly and evaluating alternative models of the situation.

The Music Is On and Popping! Two-way Tables:

This MEA is designed to have teams of 4 students look at data in a two-way table. Teams must discuss which categorical or quantitative factors might be the driving force of a song's popularity. Hopefully, popular songs have some common thread running through them.

Each team must write down their thought process on how they will create the most popular playlist of songs for a local radio station. A major constraint for each team is to thoroughly explain how they will maximize the 11 minutes available with the most popular songs.

Students will be provided with letters from a local radio station, WMMM - where you can receive your "Daily Mix of Music and Math." WMMM has 10 songs and the researchers have collected data on each. Student teams: it is your responsibility to pick the playlist and write a letter to the station supporting why you made your particular selection. The winning team gets an opportunity to record a sound bite which introduces their playlist on the radio.

Now, just when the teams believe they have addressed WMMM's request, a twist is thrown in the midst, and the student teams must return to the drawing board and write a second letter to the station which may or may not affect the team's original playlist.

Do you have the musical swag to connect the associations?

Barbie Bungee (linear functions):

In this lesson students collect data using a rubber band bungee cord and a Barbie doll, construct a scatter plot, generate a line of best fit, and consequently examine linear functions.
(from NCTM Illuminations)

Shake it up:

Students will model molecular motion with everyday materials (shaker bottles) then associate their model/actions to the phase transitions of water while graphing its heat curve from data collected during a structured inquiry lab.

Interpreting Statistics: A Case of Muddying the Waters:

This lesson is intended to help you assess how well students are able to:

  • Interpret data and evaluate statistical summaries.
  • Critique someone else's interpretations of data and evaluations of statistical summaries.

The lesson also introduces students to the dangers of misapplying simple statistics in real-world contexts, and illustrates some of the common abuses of statistics and charts found in the media.

The Election Resource:

This lesson is designed for students who enrolled in an elementary statistics or math for college readiness class who are at the stage of collecting and analyzing data. In their algebra 1 class, they were introduced to statistical topics such as line of best-fit and equation of a line as they relate to real-world meaning.

Got You Covered!:

Students will develop a procedure for selecting car covers to protect the fleet of vehicles used by the Everywhere Sales Corporation. They will use a given data table to consider the attributes of several different brands of car covers, analyze their strengths and weaknesses, and then rank and weight the attributes according to their level of importance. The procedure will be written out in detail and a rationale provided to advise the company which car cover(s) should be used.

Lesson IV: The Trials of Phillis Wheatley-- A Debate:

This is the fourth and final lesson in a small unit on the life and works of Phillis Wheatley. This is a Sample Lesson Plan provided directly by the Common Core, Inc. Although details are given only for this final lesson, some information is given on the preceding three lessons.

Analyzing and Responding to Gwendolyn Brooks' "We Real Cool" :

In this lesson sequence, students will read and analyze the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks. For the summative technology. As an

Analyzing and Comparing Medieval and Modern Ballads:

Students read, analyze, and discuss medieval English ballads and then list characteristics of the genre. They then emphasize the narrative characteristics of ballads by choosing a ballad to act out. Using the Venn diagram tool, students next compare medieval ballads with modern ones. After familiarizing themselves with ballad themes and forms, students write their own original ballads, which they perform in small groups. Finally, students engage in self-reflection on their group performances and on the literary characteristics of their ballads.

An Exploration of The Crucible through Seventeenth-Century Portraits:

After reading Act 1 of The Crucible in which 13 of the 21 characters are introduced, students create Trading Cards to describe and analyze an assigned character. Then they explore portraits of Puritans online to assist them in creating a portrait of the character and present a rationale to explain their work of art. A "Portrait Gallery" is set up around the classroom, so the students are able to refer to portraits during later acts and better understand the characters' motives and relationships.

Comparing Portrayals of Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Photography and Literature:

Huck Finn's moral journey parallels Mark Twain's own questions about slavery. Like the photographers of the nineteenth-century, Twain, a Realist, struggled with how best to portray fictionalized characters, while still expressing truth and creating social commentary. In this lesson, students use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast Mark Twain's novel and/or excerpts from Frederick Doulgass' narrative to original photographs of slaves from the late-nineteenth century. Then they write an essay to compare the different portrayals, arguing to what extent art can reliably reflect truth. In addition, they will discuss art as social commentary.

Close Reading Exemplar: Living Like Weasels:

The goal of this four-day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to discover the rich language and life lesson embedded in Dillard’s text. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will be equipped to unpack Dillard’s essay. When combined with writing about the passage, students will learn to appreciate how Dillard’s writing contains a deeper message and derive satisfaction from the struggle to master complex text.

Technology vs. Ethics Debate:

Students will debate several controversial issues such as human cloning, use of performance enhancing drugs in sports, and space exploration in order to determine which they deem more important to society: technology or ethics. After brainstorming a list of issues and cutting it down to 8, students will be given 4 to 5 days to research the issues and prepare for the debate. Students will not know which side they are debating until the debate begins. The purpose of this exercise is for students to carefully consider both sides of issues, as well as alternatives, and to understand the importance of maintaining a healthy balance between ethics and technology.
After the debate,students will write about what they have learned in terms of the issues themselves, their team's performance in the debate, and whether or not their opinion has changed on any issue due to some important point made during the debate.

Show Me a Hero, and I Will Write You a Tragedy – F. Scott Fitzgerald - Part 1:

The goal of Part 1 of this three-part exemplar lesson is to give secondary students an opportunity to explore targeted passages of complex text by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Through repeated readings of a targeted section from The Great Gatsby, the effective use of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led), students recognize common themes that emerge during an era of irresponsibility and self-absorption. The lesson culminates with a one-page objective summation of the emerging theme and motivations of residents of East Egg and West Egg.

Show Me a Hero, and I Will Write You a Tragedy – F. Scott Fitzgerald - Part 2:

Part 2 of this three-part exemplar lesson gives secondary students an opportunity to explore targeted passages of complex text by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The goal of Part 2 is to analyze an excerpt from F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story, "The Offshore Pirate" (1920) in Flappers and Philosophers. This targeted excerpt requires students to closely examine both the material success and eventual disillusionment that marked the Jazz Age in literature. Text-dependent questions guides students to deeper analysis as they craft their own questions, actively participate in student-directed discussions, develop theme statements, and use sound reasoning and textual evidence to support their literary analysis. The lesson culminates with a one-page comparison of Ardita and Carlyle.

Universal Theme: The Cycle of Life:

Through an analysis of the myth of Daedalus and Icarus, Pieter Bruegel the Elder's painting "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," and E. E. Cummings' poem "anyone lived in a pretty how town," students will come to realize the importance of the cycle of life and nature as it pertains to human existence. The three texts come from dramatically different genres, time periods, and settings capturing the essence of a universal theme.

Free Willy? An Argument Analysis of the Controversy over Captive Killer Whale Populations:

In this lesson, students will conduct several close readings of the article "SeaWorld, Activists Make Questionable Claims on Killer Whale Life Spans" by Jason Garcia. For the first close reading, students will focus on selected academic vocabulary. In the second reading, students will analyze the claims made in the article, focusing, in particular, on the validity of each claim made. During the final close reading, students will analyze the argument presented in the article, choose a side, and participate in a Philosophical Chairs discussion.

Tribal Tributes: Getting to Know Our Native American Ancestors Part 1 of 3:

The goal of Part 1 of this three-lesson mini-unit is to provide secondary students the opportunity to practice and apply research skills through a short research project on Native Americans. Students will work in collaborative groups to gather information on Native Americans from specific regions and develop and present a PowerPoint based on the research.

Narrative of the Captivity Close Reading:

Students will read and interpret the "Narrative of the Captivity", identify and analyze how Rowlandson's use of allusion contributes to the meaning of her account, identify the main idea and supporting details, express understanding through writing and speaking, and understand and use new words. In this in-depth analysis lesson, students will experience a variety of compact and engaging instructional structures, including a Logic Lineup, Jot Thoughts, and Philosophical Chairs. Supporting materials for the activities are included, and all structures contribute to the culminating activity of composing a high-quality literary analysis essay.

Plants versus Pollutants Model Eliciting Activity:

The Plants versus Pollutants MEA provides students with an open-ended problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best plants to clean up certain toxins. This MEA requires students to formulate a phytoremediation-based solution to a problem involving cleaning of a contaminated land site. Students are provided the context of the problem, a request letter from a client asking them to provide a recommendation, and data relevant to the situation. Students utilize the data to create a defensible model solution to present to the client.

Alternative Fuel Systems:

The Alternative Fuel Systems MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must develop a procedure to decide the appropriate course for an automobile manufacturer to take given a set of constraints. The main focus of the MEA is to apply the concepts of work and energy to a business model.

And Justice for All: The Trail of Tears, Mexican Deportation, and Japanese Internment:

Many textbooks mention the Trail of Tears, but fail to mention that this early displacement of an ethnic minority is only one of many legally-sanctioned forced relocations. This lesson will address the displacement of American Indians through the Trail of Tears, the forced deportation of Mexican Americans during the Great Depression, and the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII.

Searching for Evidence of Dark Energy:

This lesson is a differentiated approach to the concept of Dark Energy and the distribution of matter in our Universe. Students begin by simulating the expansion of the Universe by creating balloon Universes which can be inflated. Students are then assigned one of four articles according to reading ability. They read their articles and then form Jigsaw groups to share the information gleaned from the articles. Students are assessed through a writing assignment.

Ocean Camouflage Colors:

Ocean Camouflage Colors explores the concept of light-wave absorption by ocean water and how it alters color perception and consequently the appropriate choice for protective coloration in the ocean. After exploring the students' prior knowledge of concepts like color perception, absorption and reflection, the class watches a video clip of a diver who takes a red apple ( and some colorful plastic) diving in the Caribbean. After some further discussion and the creation of a set of notes, students are given a more formal reading activity with 5 questions to complete independently (in most cases). This reading activity can be used in class or possibly as a homework exercise if time is short. Ocean Camouflage Colors was intended as an extension activity to support the 2 mini-labs in Ocean Camouflage. The reading portion can be used alone to bring students who were absent the day of the mini-labs "up to speed" OR it can be used as a review exercise prior to a test OR a homework activity for further practice.

Newton's Three Laws of Motion: A Student-Centered Approach:

This is an extended lesson that will take approximately two to three weeks to complete. Students begin by completing an inertial balance lab, which includes a graphing and data analysis component, in order to introduce them to Newton's First Law of Motion. Students then go on to complete a Webquest to reinforce Newton's First Law and to learn about Newton's Second Law and Free-body Diagrams. The class then participates in a demonstration to learn Newton's Third Law of Motion. Students then either complete a worksheet to practice calculations involving Newton's Second Law or an inquiry lab to understand how Newton's Laws can be used to build Balloon Rocket Cars (or both!). Finally, students complete an original project by writing a letter, recording a song, or creating a poster to demonstrate their mastery of Newton's Three Laws of Motion.

Momentum and the Law of Conservation of Momentum: A Student-Centered Lesson:

This is a largely self-paced unit for students to learn the basics of Momentum as well as the Law of Conservation of Momentum. Students complete two investigative exercises (one hands-on, the other virtual). They then are directed to read a website (or a textbook could be substituted) and take notes with the teacher's support as needed. After taking their own notes, students complete a worksheet to practice calculations involving the Law of Conservation of Momentum. At the end of the unit, students take a traditional summative x - h)2 + (y - k)2 = r2'>circles and their tangents to a historical real-world scenario, the Mason-Dixon Line, and a hypothetical real-world scenario, the North-South Florida Line.

Linear Motion:

The lesson explores ways for students to describe linear motion and investigate relationships between the velocity, acceleration, and the concepts of vector/scalar quantities.

The Most Beneficial Bank:

In this MEA, students will work in cooperative groups to discuss and come up with a procedure to rank the banks from best to worst.

Determining the Empirical Formula of Hydrates:

Students will apply the mole concept and the law of conservation of mass to determine the empirical formula of a hydrate. Students will also use data from their experiment to understand the concept of mole ratios, formulas and predicting products from reactions. Students will interpret formula representation of compounds and understand their percent composition.

Formation of Oceanic Features:

This is a picture inquiry based lesson for students to explore four specific oceanic features (mid-ocean ridge, trench, seamount, and continental shelf). Groups of three students will observe and explain features found in pictures and share ideas with their peers.

Formation of Hurricanes:

This is a picture inquiry based lesson for students to explore the formation of hurricanes. Groups of three students will observe and explain trends found in a picture and share ideas with their peers.

Reading Like a Historian: Snapshot Autobiography :

In this unique 2-day lesson, students reflect on events from their own lives to understand how learning history depends on different perspectives and the reliability of source information. On Day 1, students write their version of their birth and discuss the limitation of their own perspective with a classmate. For homework, they then create an autobiographical "pamphlet" of key events and must interview another person to get their perspective on the event, corroborating the 2 versions and taking notes on the interview. On Day 2, students share their events and what they have learned, and the teacher explains how studying history depends on a similar corroboration-cross-checking-of evidence.

Don't have Issues, Learn the Tissues!:

This project lesson is designed to allow students to make personal connections between abstract art, photography, and histology of human tissues. As a brief introduction, students explore current topics in regenerative medicine and cutting-edge technology in medical sciences associated with disease treatment and amputee treatment. Students will get the opportunity to survey Impressionist area art and histology slides of tissues. Student presentations will be comprehensive and involve multiple levels of cognitive abilities. This lesson provides a unique way for cross-curricular and interdisciplinary teaching and learning opportunities.

Presidential Learning:

This web resource from Smithsonian's History Explorer presents a series of lesson plans related to the American presidency. Through the lessons' activities and content, students will understand the evolution of presidential campaigns, explore the roles and responsibilities of the presidency, and learn about historical movements/events which limited the power of the position. Students will also research the impact of the media on the President's image and conduct interviews related to presidential loss/mourning.

Reading Like a Historian: Pocahontas:

This lesson focuses around two different versions of John Smith's "rescue" by Pocahontas. Students compare and contrast the two versions and encounter the idea of subjectivity versus objectivity in primary source historical documents. Finally, they read the brief opinions of two historians who provide their perspectives on the incident.

Reading Like a Historian: Puritans :

This lesson utilizes 2 primary sources—John Winthrop's "City on a Hill" speech and John Cotton's "The Divine Right to Occupy the Land" speech—to challenge students with the fundamental question: Were the Puritans selfish or selfless? Students respond by answering questions, writing an informal extended response utilizing textual evidence from both speeches, and discussing the issue in class.

Comparing and Contrasting Robber Barons with Modern Entrepreneurs:

This lesson will compare robber barons from the Gilded Age/Industrialization Period with prominent business people of the last few decades. Students will identify characteristics of robber barons and determine if current business people would be considered robber barons. The students will complete this by organizing information into the Robber Baron t-chart and responding to guiding questions.

Teaching About Slavery Through Newspaper Advertisements:

In this lesson, students will analyze primary source documents. To enhance their understanding of the history of American slavery, students will analyze newspaper advertisements related to slavery from a North Carolina newspaper in 1837. Students will develop their own thoughtful analyses and express their ideas in writing; several writing x is paired with a unique value of y. More formally, a function from A to B is a relation f such that every elong A is uniquely associated with an object F(aelong B.'>functions. Students will review several resources on fungi as well as conduct an investigation using yeast to compare its decomposition properties.

Unit / Lesson Sequence

Name

Description

Modeling for Understanding Natural Selection:

This series of lessons introduces students to evolutionary reasoning and to the explanatory power of the Darwinian model of natural selection. Students read three evolutionary scientists' (Paley, Lamarck and Darwin) original work and compare their thinking, proposed mechanism of evolution, use of evidence, and explanatory power of their theory. They apply the three scientists thinking to another scenario to refine their understanding of the explanations.

Middle School Chemistry Unit | Chapter 6 | Chemical Change:

Students explore the concept that chemical reactions involve the breaking of certain bonds between atoms in the reactants, and the rearrangement and rebonding of these atoms to make the products. Students also design tests to investigate how the amount of products and the rate of the reaction can be changed. Students will also explore endothermic and exothermic reactions.

Enzyme Reactions:

This video shows an enzyme reaction lab. The teacher demonstrates how the enzyme, catalase, reacts with hydrogen peroxide (a substrate found in cells). The teacher first demonstrates a normal enzyme reaction. He or she then goes on to show how manipulating temperature and pH will affect the reaction of an enzyme.

Quadratic Functions: Workshop 4:

Lesson 1 of two lessons requires students to explore quadratic functions by examining the family of functions described by y = a (x - h)squared+ k. In Lesson 2 students explore quadratic functions by using a motion detector known as a Calculator Based Ranger (CBR) to examine the heights of the different bounces of a ball. Students will represent each bounce with a quadratic function of the form y = a (x - h)squared + k. Background information, resources, references and videos of the lessons are included. Students work in teams of four.

Movement with Functions:

These three lessons use movement to reinforce the concepts of linear functions and systems of equations. Tools such as motion detectors and remote-controlled cars are used, giving them multiple representations for better understanding. They will also explore how position, speed, and varying motion are reflected in graphs, tables and algebraic expressions.

Individual Lessons

  • Lesson 1: How Should I Move?
    • This lesson uses a motion detector to help students understand graphs and equations. They will experience constant and variable rates of change, and be challenged to consider graphs where no movements are possible to create them. Multiple representations will help students build their fluency with how graphs, tables, equations, and physical modeling are connected.
  • Lesson 2: How Did I Move?
    • This lesson focuses on giving students a method to better understand the slope-intercept equation y=mx+b. A common problem is that when students learn about it, they tend to mechanically substitute for m and b without understanding their functions. This lesson provides students with a method for understanding tat m is a rate of change, and that b is the value when x=0. Utilizing a kinesthetic activity, students will form a physical interpretation of slope and y-intercept by running across a football field. Thus, students will be able to verbalize the meaning of the equation, and discover that slope is the same for all sets of points given a set of data with a linear relationship.
  • Lesson 3: Road Rage
    • Remote-controlled cars are used to create a system of equations in this lesson. The cars crashing corresponds to the solution of the system. Graphs, scatter plots, equations, tables, and technological tools are used to give students multiple representations. They will calculate the time and place of the crash, then test the results.

Analyzing Famous Speeches as Arguments:

After gaining skills through analyzing a historic and contemporary speech as a class, students will select a famous speech from a list compiled from several resources and write an essay that identifies and explains the rhetorical strategies that the author deliberately chose while crafting the text to make an effective argument. Their analysis will consider questions such as: "What makes the speech an argument?", "How did the author's rhetoric evoke a response from the audience?", and "Why are the words still venerated today?".

Analyzing a Famous Speech:

After gaining skill through analyzing a historic and contemporary speech as a class, students will select a famous speech from a list compiled from several resources and write an essay that identifies and explains the rhetorical strategies that the author deliberately chose while crafting the text to make an effective argument. Their analysis will consider questions such as: What makes the speech an argument?, How did the author's rhetoric evoke a response from the audience?, and Why are the words still venerated today?

Seeking Social Justice through Satire: Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal":

JJonathan Swift's 1729 pamphlet "A Modest Proposal" is a model for satirizing social problems. In this 2 week unit, students complete multiple readings of Swift's essay: a guided reading with the teacher, a collaborative reading with a peer, and an independent reading. Through guided reading questions, students will examine satiric devices used by Swift, in addition to analyzing tone and how the various sections of the piece work togeher. Then, pairs of students will develop a mock television newscast or editorial script, like those found on Saturday Night Live's "Weekend Update," The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, or The Colbert Report, including appropriate visual images in PowerPoint. In their script, students will collaboratively identify a contemporary social problem, analyze it, and develop an outrageous satiric solution to resolve it.

Worksheet

Name

Description

The Biology Corner:

This resource for biology teachers includes a lesson plan section which contains classroom activities, labs and worksheets. The activity sheets are categorized by Science and Literacy, Anatomy, Scientific Method, Cells, Phyla, Evolution and Taxonomy, Genetics, Ecology, and Plants.

Dragon Genetics -- Independent Assortment and Gene Linkage :

This is a lab/activity that uses dragons as "research subjects" for genetics research. It highlights independent assortment as well as gene linkage. Students will do the first part of the activity using independent assortment (genes on different chromosomes). The second part of the activity looks at genes on the same chromosome, and how linkage plays a part in allele assortment. It can be used to show how crossing over allows increased variation when involving linked genes.

Worksheets are available in both Word and PDF formats, for both teacher and student. There is an additional dragon genetics lab that illustrates the principles of Mendelian genetics as a whole.

Practice with Dimensional Analysis:

This is a worksheet that can be used for students individually or as a cooperative learning resource for practice with dimensional analysis. Answers are in red as a separate copy of the worksheet.

Quadratic Functions:

This worksheet gives students one place to show all transformations (reflections, vertical stretches/compressions, and translations) for the quadratic function. The worksheet also has a place for domain and range for each transformation.

Virtual Manipulative

Name

Description

Mesquite - Phylogenetic Trees:

Students use software to create evolutionary trees by comparing and contrasting physical traits.

This activity demonstrates the complexity of creating evolutionary trees when multiple traits are being analyzed. The use of the software simplifies the analysis without compromising the learning objectives.

Vitamin B1 - Chicken Farm Game:

This game is based on the 1929 Nobel Prize in

·  Predict how the intensity of light absorbed/transmitted will change with changes in solution type, solution concentration, container width, or light source and explain why?

Reactions Rates:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore what makes a reaction happen by colliding atoms and molecules. They will be able to design their own experiments with different reactions, concentrations, and temperatures. They will also be able to recognize what affect the rate of a reaction.

Some of the sample learning goals can be: 

  • Explain why and how a pinball shooter can be used to help understand ideas about reactions.
  • Describe on a microscopic level what contributes to a successful reaction.
  • Describe how the reaction coordinate can be used to predict whether a reaction will proceed or slow.
  • Use the potential energy diagram to determine : The activation energy for the forward and reverse reactions; The difference in energy between reactants and products; The relative potential energies of the molecules at different positions on a reaction coordinate.
  • Draw a potential energy diagram from the energies of reactants and products and activation energy.
  • Predict how raising or lowering the temperature will affect a system in the equilibrium.

Molarity:


This virtual manipulative will help the students understand what determines the concentration of a solution. They will learn about the relationships between moles, liters and molarity by adjusting the amount of solute, and solution volume. Students can change solutes to compare different chemical compounds in water.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Describe the relationships between volume and amount of solute to concentration
  • Explain how solution color and concentration are related.
  • Calculate the concentration of solutions in units of molarity (mol/L)
  • Compare solubility limits between solutes.

Step Growth Polymerization:


This activity will help the students learn about the polymerization. The process of polymerization can be classified into two categories: Chain growth polymerization and step growth polymerization. In this activity students will understand the process of step growth polymerization in which bi-functional or multi-functional monomers react to form polymers.

Catalysis:


This interactive animation presented here helps in understanding the concept of catalysis, which is defined as the process of accelerating the process of chemical reaction with the use of a catalyst. This visual conceptualization will provide the students with the opportunity to test their knowledge and understanding about the concepts.

Natural Selection:

Students will explore natural selection by controlling the environment and causing mutations in bunnies. This will demonstrate how natural selection works in nature. They will have the opportunity to throw in different variables to see what will make their species of rabbit survive.

Peppered Moths: Natural Selection in Black and White:

This is an interactive resource that illustrates the classic peppered moth natural selection model. It includes interactive lesson, activity, and history.

Norn Genetics:

This is a simplified, interactive demonstration of genetic principles. Using a fictional species named the Norn, students can predict the outcome of genetic crosses (mono and di-hybrid, sex-linked, and multiple-allele). This could be used to strengthen the students understanding of genetics, practice Punnet squares, or practice calculation of genotypic/phenotypic ratios. However, it is unlikely to be useful as an independent assignment (if used as designed).

Virtual Lab: Punnett Squares:

In this resource, students can watch a short video to better understand Punnett Squares, then practice their understanding with the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, scenarios are presented using flies where the student has to determine the genotypes of the parent flies based on the information given. Once the parent genotypes are entered correctly, the student then has to determine the genotype and phenotype combinations in the Punnett Square.

DNA Replication Animation:

This resource is an animation to explain DNA replication. It is an interactive simulation activity for students. See also "Transcription and Translation Animation" to get all of the steps from DNA to protein.

DNA-The Double Helix:


In this interactive game, the students will understand how a DNA molecule is built up, how the copies of the DNA molecule made and what is the meaning of base-pairing. The job of the students in this game is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching the base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

DNA Polymerase:


In this activity students will recognize that DNA polymerase is responsible for the process of DNA replication, during which a double-stranded DNA molecule is copied into two identical DNA molecules. DNA ploymerase catalyze the polymerization of deoxyribonucleotides alongside a DNA strand, which they read and use as a template. The newly-polymerized molecule is complementary to the template strand.

DNA - The Double Helix Game:

DNA is the genetic material of all known living organisms and some viruses. DNA contains two stands wrapped around each other in a helix, and these stands are held in place by four chemicals called bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The bases pair up with each other in a specific manner to form units called base pairs - adenine always pairs with thymine, and cytosine always pairs with guanine.
In this game your job is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

Nucleotides Games:

This fun game requires the students to locate and destroy the nucleotide indicated in the box at the bottom right of the screen. The students are required to select the correct molecular structure for each of the nucleotides and gain the points.

DNA to Protein:

This website contains many interactive activities that can be used by students to gain an understanding of translation and transcription.

Transcription and Translation Animation:

This interactive animation allows students to replicate the steps of protein synthesis from DNA. It coincides with the resource "DNA Replication Animation".

Translation: Making a protein from a messenger RNA:


The genes in DNA encode protein molecules. Expressing a gene means manufacturing its corresponding protein.Translation is the key process of making a protein from the genetic code expresses in the DNA. In translation, messenger RNA is read according to the genetic code, which relates the DNA sequence to the amino acid sequence in proteins. This virtual manipulative will allow the students to understand the process of translation. Students will also get a chance to observe, what happens when a new random mutation generates stop codons.

Protein Synthesis:

This visual tutorial of the complex biochemical process helps the student to understand the process of protein synthesis. This manipulative gives the students detailed information starting with the basics of genetic codes called codons. Next, the lesson then leads the students towards detailed information of mRNA, tRNA and rRNAs. The final phase helps students by describing the complete process of protein synthesis from initiation, to elongation and then to termination. The tutorial offers check questions at every stage to ensure students are learning the important information.

Build a GeneNetwork:


The lac operon is a set of genes which are responsible for the metabolism of lactose in some bacterial cells. Students will explore the effects of mutation within the lac operon by adding or removing genes from the DNA.

  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the various genes and DNA control elements are mutated (added or removed).
  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the concentration of lactose is changed.
  • Explain the roles of Lacl, LacZ, and LacY in lactose regulation.

The Tuberculosis Experiments and Discoveries Game:

This game explores the 1905 Novel prize in 3 is the exponential form of 2 x 2 x 2. The number two (2) is called the base, and the number three (3) is called the exponent.'>exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. This tool allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Using tabs at the top of the page you can also access supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Data Flyer:

In this activity, students input a function where the constants, coefficients, and exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. Students can also input data points to be graphed in the same window. This activity allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Students can also practice adjusting the parameters of an equation in order to find a function representation of their data. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Slope Slider:

In this activity, students adjust slider bars, which adjust the coefficients and constants of a linear function, and examine how their changes affect the graph. The equation of the line can be in slope-intercept form or standard form. This activity allows students to explore linear equations, slopes, and y-intercepts and their visual representation on a graph. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Tool to Exploring Exponential Functions:

An interactive applet in which students or teachers can visualize how changes in the parameters of the exponential function, y = a(b) x + c, affect the shape of the graph.

Curve Fitting:

The students will plot points on a graph and watch as a polynomial is made.

Equation Grapher:

This interactive simulation investigates graphing linear and quadratic equations. Users are given the ability to define and change the coefficients and constants in order to observe resulting changes in the graph(s).

Graphing Equations:

This resource repeatedly provides a sample linear function in standard form and asks the user to graph it on an interactive graph below the problem. The interactive graphing tool provides immediate feedback on the solution to the problem whether the user graphs it correctly or not.

Histogram Tool:

This virtual manipulative histogram tool can aid in analyzing the distribution of a dataset. It has 6 preset datasets and a function to add your own data for analysis.

Univariate and Bivariate Data:

This lesson is designed to introduce students to the difference between univariate and bivariate data, and how the two can be represented graphically. This lesson provides links to model discussions and online graphing applets, as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one.

Advanced Data Grapher:

This is an online graphing utility that is a great supplement to any lesson on graphing box plots, bubble graphs, scatterplots, histograms, and stem-and-leaf plots.

Normal Distribution Interactive Activity:

With this online tool, students adjust the standard deviation and sample size of a normal distribution to see how it will affect a histogram of that distribution. This activity allows students to explore the effect of changing the sample size in an experiment and the effect of changing the standard deviation of a normal distribution. Tabs at the top of the page provide access to supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Speed of Light in Transparent Materials:

  • Study the relation between the speed of light and the refractive index of the medium it passes through
  • Choose from a collection of materials with known refractive indices and obtain the speed of light as it passes through
  • Learn why light-years are used as an astronomical measurement of distance.

Reflection of Light:

  • Use Snell's Law (also called the Law of Refraction) to show why the angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence for a plane mirror
  • Compare incident angles to reflected angles
  • Observe the reflection process for light beams of different wavelengths hitting a flat surface at different incident angles

Refraction of Light:

  • Observe the refraction of light as it passes from one medium to another
  • Study the relation between refraction of light and the refractive index of the medium
  • Select from a list of materials with different refractive indices
  • Change the light beam from white to monochromatic and observe the difference

Human Eye Accommodation:

  • Observe how the eye's muscles change the shape of the lens in accordance with the distance to the object being viewed
  • Indicate the parts of the eye that are responsible for vision
  • View how images are formed in the eye

Concave Spherical Mirrors:

  • Learn how a concave spherical mirror generates an image
  • Observe how the size and position of the image changes with the object distance from the mirror
  • Learn the difference between a real image and a virtual image
  • Learn some applications of concave mirrors

Convex Spherical Mirrors:

  • Learn how a convex mirror forms the image of an object
  • Understand why convex mirrors form small virtual images
  • Observe the change in size and position of the image with the change in object's distance from the mirror
  • Learn some practical applications of convex mirrors

Color Temperature in a Virtual Radiator:

  • Observe the change of color of a black body radiator upon changes in temperature
  • Understand that at 0 Kelvin or Absolute Zero there is no molecular motion

Solar Cell Operation:

  • Observe how a solar cell converts light energy into electrical energy
  • Learn about the different components of the solar cell
  • Observe the relationship between photon intensity and amount of electrical energy produced
  • Understand the development of solar cell technology over the past half century

Geometrical Construction of Ray Diagrams:

  • Learn to trace the path of propagating light waves using geometrical optics
  • Observe the effect of changing parameters such as focal length, object dimensions and position on image properties
  • Learn the equations used in determining the size and locations of images formed by thin lenses

Electromagnetic Wave Propagation:

  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Basic Electromagnetic Wave Properties:

  • Explore the relationship between wavelength, frequency, amplitude and energy of an electromagnetic wave
  • Compare the characteristics of waves of different wavelengths

Observing Objects in Water:

  • Explore how objects in water seem to be closer to the surface of a water body than they really are, when viewed from land
  • Visually differentiate between the image seen by the eye and the actual position of the object
  • Adjust the water depth to demonstrate the changes in the position of the virtual image
  • Explain that refraction takes place when light rays pass from one medium to another

WebQuest

Name

Description

DNA WebQuest:

This resource directs users to interactive games and tutorials on the topics of DNA replication, transcription, translation, gene expression, and mutation.

Histogram:

In this activity, students input data to be represented in a histogram. Students can adjust the interval size using a slider bar and they can also adjust the other scales on the graph. This activity allows students to explore histograms as a way to represent data as well as the concepts of mean, standard deviation, and scale. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Problem-Solving Task

Name

Description

Introduction to the Microscope:

Students will learn about the proper use and handling of the compound microscope.

Anolis Lizards of the Greater Antilles: Using phylogeny to test hypotheses :

Students "take a trip" to the Greater Antilles to figure out how the Anolis lizards on the islands might have evolved. They begin by observing the body structures and habitat of different species, then plot this data on a map of the islands to look for patterns in their distribution. From the patterns they observe, students develop alternative hypotheses about how these lizards colonized the islands and evolved. To test their hypotheses, they are given a phylogeny which they color code according to their previous data. By combining both types of data, students make a final hypothesis about how they think the lizards colonized the islands.

Traffic Jam:

This resource poses the question, "how many vehicles might be involved in a traffic jam 12 miles long?"

This task, while involving relatively simple arithmetic, promps students to practice modeling (MP4), work with units and conversion (N-Q.1), and develop a new unit (N-Q.2). Students will also consider the appropriate level of accuracy to use in their conclusions (N-Q.3).

Felicia's Drive:

This task provides students the opportunity to make use of units to find the gas need (N-Q.1). It also requires them to make some sensible approximations (e.g., 2.92 gallons is not a good answer to part (a)) and to recognize that Felicia's situation requires her to round up. Various answers to (a) are possible, depending on how much students think is a safe amount for Felicia to have left in the tank when she arrives at the gas station. The key point is for them to explain their choices. This task provides an opportunity for students to practice MP2, Reason abstractly and quantitatively, and MP3, Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Harvesting the Fields:

This is a challenging task, suitable for extended work, and reaching into a deep understanding of units. The task requires students to exhibit MP1, Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. An algebraic solution is possible but complicated; a numerical solution is both simpler and more sophisticated, requiring skilled use of units and quantitative reasoning. Thus the task aligns with either A-CED.1 or N-Q.1, depending on the approach.

How Much is a Penny Worth?:

This task asks students to calculate the cost of materials to make a penny, utilizing rates of grams of copper.

Ice Cream Van:

The purpose of this task is to engage students, probably working in groups, in a substantial and open-ended modeling problem. Students will have to brainstorm or research several relevant quantities, and incorporate these values into their solutions.

Runners' World:

This task provides students with an opportunity to engage in Standard for Mathematical Practice 6, attending to precision. It intentionally omits some relevant information -- namely, that a typical soda can holds 12 oz of fluid, that a pound is equivalent to 16 dry ounces, and that an ounce of water weighs approximately 1.04 dry ounces (at the temperature of the human body) -- in the interest of having students discover that these are relevant quantities. The incompleteness of the problem statement makes the task more amenable to having students do work in groups.

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Weed killer:

The principal purpose of the task is to explore a real-world application problem with algebra, working with units and maintaining reasonable levels of accuracy throughout. Of particular interest is that the optimal solution for long-term purchasing of the active ingredient is achieved by purchasing bottle C, whereas minimizing total cost for a particular application comes from purchasing bottle B. Students might need the instructor's aid to see that this is just the observation that buying in bulk may not be a better deal if the extra bulk will go unused.

Fuel Efficiency:

The problem requires students to not only convert miles to kilometers and gallons to liters but they also have to deal with the added complication of finding the reciprocal at some point.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating II:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating I:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Bus and Car:

This task operates at two levels. In part it is a simple exploration of the relationship between speed, distance, and time. Part (c) requires understanding of the idea of average speed, and gives an opportunity to address the common confusion between average speed and the average of the speeds for the two segments of the trip.

At a higher level, the task addresses N-Q.3, since realistically neither the car nor the bus is going to travel at exactly the same speed from beginning to end of each segment; there is time traveling through traffic in cities, and even on the autobahn the speed is not constant. Thus students must make judgements about the level of accuracy with which to report the result.

Calories in a Sports Drink:

This problem involves the meaning of numbers found on labels. When the level of accuracy is not given we need to make assumptions based on how the information is reported. An unexpected surprise awaits in this case, however, as no reasonable interpretation of the level of accuracy makes sense of the information reported on the bottles in parts (b) and (c). Either a miscalculation has been made or the numbers have been rounded in a very odd way.

Dinosaur Bones:

The purpose of this task is to illustrate through an absurd example the fact that in real life quantities are reported to a certain level of accuracy, and it does not make sense to treat them as having greater accuracy.

The Canoe Trip, Variation 1:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice constructing functions that represent a quantity of interest in a context, and then interpreting features of the function in the light of the context. It can be used as either an assessment to see if students can make sense of a graph in the context of a real world situation. Students also have to pay attention to the scale on the vertical axis to find the correct match. The first and third graphs look very similar at first glance, but the function values are very different since the scales on the vertical axis are very different. The task could also be used to generate a group discussion on interpreting functions given by graphs.

Logistic Growth Model, Abstract Version:

This task is for instructional purposes only and students should already be familiar with some specific examples of logistic growth functions. The goal of this task is to have students appreciate how different constants influence the shape of a graph.

Logistic Growth Model, Explicit Version:

This problem introduces a logistic growth model in the concrete settings of estimating the population of the U.S. The model gives a surprisingly accurate estimate and this should be contrasted with linear and exponential models.

Telling a Story with Graphs:

In this task students are given graphs of quantities related to weather. The purpose of the task is to show that graphs are more than a collection of coordinate points, that they can tell a story about the variables that are involved and together they can paint a very complete picture of a situation, in this case the weather. Features in one graph, like maximum and minimum points correspond to features in another graph, for example on a rainy day the solar radiation is very low and the cumulative rainfall graph is increasing with a large slope.

Throwing Baseballs:

This task could be used for x is paired with a unique value of y. More formally, a function from A to B is a relation f such that every elong A is uniquely associated with an object F(aelong B.'>functions that are each represented differently, one as the graph of a quadratic function and one written out algebraically. Specifically, we are asking the students to determine which function has the greatest maximum and the greatest non-negative root.

Warming and Cooling:

This task is meant to be a straight-forward x is paired with a unique value of y. More formally, a function from A to B is a relation f such that every elong A is uniquely associated with an object F(aelong B.'>functions to model the movement of a point around a wheel and, through space. Students also interpret features of graphs in terms of the given real-world context.

Graphs of Quadratic Functions:

Students compare graphs of different quadratic functions, then produce equations of their own to satisfy given conditions.

This exploration can be done in class near the beginning of a unit on graphing parabolas. Students need to be familiar with intercepts, and need to know what the vertex is. It is effective after students have graphed parabolas in vertex form (y=a(x–h)2+k), but have not yet explored graphing other forms.

Graphs of Power Functions:

This task requires students to recognize the graphs of different (positive) powers of x.

Archimedes and the King's Crown:

This problem solving task uses the tale of Archimedes and the King of Syracuse's crown to determine the volume and mass of gold and silver.

Eratosthenes and the circumference of the earth:

This problem solving task gives an interesting context for implementing ideas from geometry and trigonometry.

How many cells are in the human body?:

This problem solving task challenges students to apply the concepts of mass, volume, and density in the real-world context to find how many cells are in the human body.

How many leaves on a tree?:

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How many leaves on a tree? (Version 2):

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How thick is a soda can? I:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the surface area of a soda can, calculate how many cubic centimeters of aluminum it contains, and estimate how thick it is.

How thick is a soda can? II:

This problem solving task asks students to explain which measurements are needed to estimate the thickness of a soda can.

Random Walk III:

The task provides a context to calculate discrete probabilities and represent them on a bar graph.

Speed Trap:

The purpose of this task is to allow students to demonstrate an ability to construct boxplots and to use boxplots as the basis for comparing distributions.

Haircut Costs:

This problem could be used as an introductory lesson to introduce group comparisons and to engage students in a question they may find amusing and interesting.

Do You Fit In This Car?:

This task requires students to use the normal distribution as a model for a data distribution. Students must use given means and standard deviations to approximate population percentages.

Should We Send Out a Certificate?:

The purpose of this task is to have students complete normal distribution calculations and to use properties of normal distributions to draw conclusions.

SAT Scores:

This problem solving task challenges students to answer probability questions about SAT scores, using distribution and mean to solve the problem.

Musical Preferences:

This problem solving task asks students to make deductions about what kind of music students like by examining a table with data.

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.

Assessment

Name

Description

Summative Assessment Evolution:

This performance task will demonstrate students' understanding of natural selection at the end of a unit on the theory of evolution.

Project

Name

Description

Transpirational Design Lab:

This is an inquiry design lab for students to understand transpirational pull of plants. Like all inquiry labs, it is open for more designs than the one presented in the PowerPoint example. The example in the PowerPoint is the easiest to implement in the classroom. It requires a growlite (a bulb that produces the UV light plants need to grow), a fan, a light source with a 100 Watt bulb, Ziplock bags, rope, and plants that are the same (I use petunias).

Factors Affecting Chemical Reaction Rates:

This website offers a number of experiments that teachers can use to demonstrate or show to the students how chemical reaction rates can be affected by different factors.

Pyramid Building:

This lesson provides students with the background to understand the importance of age structure on population growth. They do this by creating a population pyramid. This process will also help them understand the meaning of different shaped "pyramids" and the impacts of these different growth patterns.

Educational Game

Name

Description

EvoDots - Software for Evolutionary Analysis:

The software application, which allows the students to simulate natural selection in a population of dots, goes along with a tutorial which is also at this site.

The Control of the Cell Cycle:

The Control of the Cell Cycle educational game is based on the 2001 Nobel Prize in

Exploring Mutant Organisms:

  • Interviews with expert scientists about the genome and mutant organisms
  • Examples on model organisms used in genome research
  • Animation explaining how mutations occur

Photosynthesis animation and other cell processes in animation:

This site has fantastic short Flash animations of intricate cell processes, including photosynthesis and the electron transport chain.

Translation:

A detailed depiction of translation, the second stage of protein synthesis. This is the third in a series of three animations on protein synthesis.

Viruses:

This videos discusses how viruses work.

Bacteria:

This video discusses how bacteria spread and the pros and cons of bacteria.

MIT BLOSSOMS - Discovering Medicines, Using Robots and Computers:

Scientists who are working to discover new medicines often use robots to prepare samples of cells, allowing them to test chemicals to identify those that might be used to treat diseases. Students will meet a scientist who works to identify new medicines. She created free software that "looks" at images of cells and determines which images show cells that have responded to the potential medicines. Students will learn about how this technology is currently enabling research to identify new antibiotics to treat tuberculosis. Students will complete hands-on activities that demonstrate how new medicines can be discovered using robots and computer software, starring the student as "the computer." In the process, the students learn about experimental design, including positive and negative controls. Students should have some introductory knowledge about the following topics: (1) biology: students should have a basic understanding of infection and good hygiene, they should know what bacteria and cells are; (2) chemistry: the students should know what a chemical compound (molecule) is. They should have an understanding that medicines, also called "drugs", are chemical compounds; (3) basic experimental design: students should understand the terms "samples" and "testing". All hand-outs necessary for this video lesson can be downloaded below.

Lab: Bacterial Transformation:

  • This activity provides a historical background about research related to bacterial analysis
  • Contains an animation that shows how enzymes work on cutting DNA strands

Cancer:

This video gives an introduction to what cancer is and how it is the by-product of the replication of broken DNA.

Cancer and the Cell Cycle:

The National Institute of Health website provides a set of short animations of the cell cycle and cancer growth.

MIT BLOSSOMS - Using DNA to Identify People:

This lesson focuses on the molecular biology technique of DNA fingerprinting: what it is, how it works, and how the data from these experiments are used for paternity testing and forensics. DNA can be used to tell people apart because humans differ from each other based on either their DNA sequences or the lengths of repeated regions of DNA. Length differences are typically used in forensics and paternity testing. The technique of gel electrophoresis separates DNA by size, thus allowing people to be identified based on analyzing the lengths of their DNA. We discuss how gel electrophoresis works, and lab footage is shown of this technique being performed in real time. Students then analyze results from these experiments and work on case examples using DNA to match babies to parents and crime scene evidence to suspects. In terms of prerequisite knowledge, it would be ideal if students already have learned that DNA is the genetic material, and that DNA is made up of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs. It also would help if students already know that each human has two versions of every piece of DNA in their genome, one from mom and one from dad. Necessary supplies for this lesson include only paper and writing utensils, and the ability to print out or display the provided handouts. The lesson will take about one class period, with roughly 30 minutes of footage and 30 minutes of activities. At the end of the lesson, an optional video tour of the Cambridge Police Department's Identification Lab is provided, giving students an opportunity to see the equipment used in crime labs to isolate both real fingerprints and DNA for DNA fingerprint analysis, from evidence found at crime scenes.

Lab: DNA Extraction:

  • Background on the discovery of the DNA double helix
  • Contains an interactive activity for base pairing
  • Contains an interactive activity for DNA extraction

Lab: DNA Fingerprint: Alu:

  • Background on tracking human ancestry using the alu marker
  • Animation on polymerase chain reaction, PCR
  • Interactive activity for performing PCR

Lab: Restriction Analysis:

  • An interactive exercise for using agarose gel electrophoresis for separating DNA molecules
  • Explain how restriction endonucleases is used in restriction analysis of DNA

Phases of Mitosis:

This video discusses the phases of mitosis.

Video: Mitosis:

This is a brief video that can be used in a 7th grade classroom to demonstrate the process of mitosis.  It could be used repeatedly to reinforce the stages as this is typically a difficult concept for middle school age students to comprehend.

Cell Division and the Cell Cycle:

This dramatic video choreographed to powerful music introduces the viewer/student to the wonder and miracle of the cell division and cell cycle. It is designed as a motivational "trailer" to be shown by Biology, Biochemistry and Life Science teachers in middle and high school.

Phases of Meiosis:

This video discusses the phases of meiosis in detail.

Mitosis, Meiosis and Sexual Reproduction:

This video describes mitosis and meiosis as it relates to sexual reproduction.

Mount St. Helens: Rising From the Ashes :

In this NSF video and reading selection evolutionary biologist and ecologist John Bishop documents the return of living things to Mount St. Helens after the largest landslide in recorded history. This is a rare opportunity for scientists to get to study a devastated area and how it comes back from scratch in such detail.

MIT BLOSSOMS - Methods for Protein Purification:

This Protein Purification video lesson is intended to give students some insight into the process and tools that scientists and engineers use to explore proteins. It is designed to extend the knowledge of students who are already somewhat sophisticated and who have a good understanding of basic biology. The question that motivates this lesson is, "what makes two cell types different?" and this question is posed in several ways. Such scientific reasoning raises the experimental question: how could you study just a subset of specialized proteins that distinguish one cell type from another? Two techniques useful in this regard are considered in the lesson. This video lesson will easily fit into a 50-minute class period, and prerequisites include a good understanding of cellular components (DNA vs. Protein vs. lipid) and some understanding of the physical features of proteins (charge, size etc). The simple cell model used here can be assembled in any kind of container and with any components of different solubility, density, charge etc. In-class activities during the video breaks include discussions, careful observations, and the use of a "very simple cell" model to explore two techniques of protein purification. Students and teachers can spend additional time discussing and exploring the question of "how we know what we know" since this lesson lends itself to the teaching of the process of science as well.

Biological Molecules:

Paul Anderson describes the four major biological molecules found in living things. He begins with a brief discussion of polymerization. Dehydration synthesis is used to connect monomers into polymers and hydrolysis breaks them down again. The major characteristics of nucleic acids are described as well as there directionality from 3' to 5' end.

Macromolecules:

This web resource is a tutorial on macromolecules. It provides some reading material on the topic and also includes animations and a quiz.

MIT BLOSSOMS - Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us:

This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups "speak louder," we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk. The downloadable Teacher's Guide found on the same page as the video, provides suggestions for classroom activities during each of the breaks between video segments.

Text Resource

Name

Description

Metastasis Stem Cells in Blood of Breast Cancer Patients Discovered:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

Science Daily posted a summary of a research study originally published in Germany about how metastasis stem cells were found in the blood of breast cancer patients.

"Top Ten Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

The reading passage is a Top Ten list by the International Society for Stem Cell Research intended to educate the general public about the myths and realities of stem cell treatments.

Illuminating the Perils of Pollution, Nature's Way:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article explores the work of Dr. Edith Widder in researching animals that make light. Specifically, she has has found a way use bioluminescence to fight pollution in the Indian River Lagoon.

The Story of Serendipity:

The article explains how some famous scientific discoveries that happened “by accident” more accurately resulted from scientific habits of mind, which allowed researchers to take full advantage of these serendipitous moments.

New Magma Layer Found Deep in Earth's Mantle?:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The National Geographic article discusses models and theories that shed new light on the structure of Earth's layers, including new evidence to suggest a molten later of rock trapped deep in the Earth's mantle. 

Berkeley Scientists Discover Inexpensive Metal Catalyst for Generating Hydrogen from Water:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article demonstrates the importance of hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels and announces the discovery of a new catalyst useful in splitting water molecules to obtain hydrogen gas. Current methods of obtaining hydrogen from natural gas, for example, release carbon and consume large amounts of energy. This new catalyst opens the possibility of making hydrogen production much less expensive and carbon neutral as compared to current technologies.

New Housecat-Size Feline Species Discovered:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The article discusses how scientists have discovered a species of Oncilla (little tiger cats) in Northeastern Brazil, which are a genetically different species than those in the rest of South America.

Remote Sheep Population Resists Genetic Drift:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes a mouflon population located on a remote island in the Indian Ocean. This population of sheep was transplanted to Haute Island over 50 years ago. Recent studies show that the population has maintained its genetic diversity. This finding challenges scientists' beliefs about the theories of genetic drift and shows the power of natural selection.

Bacteria Learn New Trick:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article shows how, through experimentation, bacteria evolve over a short period of time. The E.coli bacteria show the ability to eat a new food, citrate, after 13,000 generations of gene mutation.

Human DNA Is Not A Document, It's An App:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses the relevance of the new findings regarding DNA coding and uses seven technological metaphors (i.e. Apps and Zappos) to compare DNA coding to contemporary physics.

Cells' Fiery Suicide in HIV Provides New Treatment Hope:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article explains how HIV-infected cells go through a self-destructive response called "pyroptosis," and how a drug might be able to prevent the infected cells' death.

What is Cancer? What Causes Cancer?:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article both identifies cancer and some of its causes; specifically, the fact that uncontrolled cell growth may result in a cancerous tumor.

IVF Pioneer Wins Medicine Nobel Prize:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article covers the topics of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), bioengineering, the scientific pioneers, and the ethical debate surrounding it.

Discovery of New Enzyme Could Yield Better Plants for Biofuel:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The text describes the discovery of a new gene that produces an enzyme that controls lignin production in plants. Withholding the gene results in less lignin in plants and makes it easier to extract sugars used in the production of biofuels.

Blood Made Suitable For All:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The text explains how blood is classified into types based on the presence of antigens. It describes a process whereby antigens can be removed by an enzyme to make all blood types the same as the universal donor.

Slug-Inspired Glue Can Heal a Broken Heart:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes a new glue, mimicking the sea slug, that can be used to mend heart defects.

Incredible Technology: How to Bring Extinct Animals Back to Life:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article discusses possible ways in which an extinct animal might be revived, as well as the potential consequences of de-extinction.

Live Cells Printed Using 'Rubber Stamp' Method:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses how new 3D printing methods can be used to print new living cells rapidly.

Plant vs. Predator:

Ecologist Daniel Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania describes how this plant's strategy came about and what's in it—both good and bad—for the bamboo, the rats and other predators, and anyone living nearby.

Cannibalistic Mantis Invades New Zealand, Eats Natives:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes a species of invasive South African Mantis. These insects have invaded New Zealand and the female of the species makes a habit of eating males that try to mate with them. Scientist are trying to uncover the reason for this attraction to the invasive species.

Will Snakes Inherit the Earth?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The author discusses the effects that invasive animals can have on an ecosystem. She initially writes about the Burmese python's effect on the Everglades and follows with the effects of other non-native species on native species. Finally, she exposes the reader to the debate about whether something should be done to control invasive species.

Cuddly Squirrel or Gray Menace?: When Invasive Species Pose an Environmental Threat:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes the widespread problem of invasive alien species across the globe and the corresponding impacts on native plants and animals. The article also discusses ideas scientists have to deal with, or even prevent, the problems of invasive species, and the challenges they face in doing so.

A Century of Melaleuca Invasion in South Florida:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article deals with the invasive exotic species of tree known as melaleuca, which is mainly an issue in Southern Florida and Everglades National Park.

Reconsidering the Value of Non-Native Species:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes the role (negative and positive) non-native species play in ecosystems.

Puffins in Peril:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The text describes the challenges the puffin faces - including possible extinction - due to global climate change.

Deforestation: Facts, Causes & Effects:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article explains the causes and locations of deforestation and explores the environmental consequences that occur because of the practice.

Stronger Storms are Bad News for Coastal Ecosystems:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article explains the effect that strong storms have on coastal ecosystems.

The Hidden World under Our Feet:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article discusses the contribution that soil biodiversity has to the larger ecosystem. It addresses the consequences of the loss of soil biodiversity resulting from human activity.

The New Alchemy:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article, from the American Chemical Society, reviews the basics of radioactivity and transmutation as well as the history of discovering elements.

400,000-Year-Old Human DNA Adds New Tangle to our Origin Story :

Modern DNA extraction methods have shed light on two extinct human cousin species. Scientists are finding new ways to study fossil mitochondrial DNA which have led to rethinking how groups of early humans should be divided evolutionarily.

Oceans May Absorb More Carbon Dioxide:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article is about plankton and how they use nutrients like carbon dioxide based on where the plankton are living.

A Hotter World is Also Hungrier, Report Warns:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article explores the large-scale effect of hunger as a result of climate change fueled by man-made greenhouse gases. 

Scientists Discover Important Mechanism in Plant Cells Which Regulates Direction Plant Cells Grow:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The text describes a discovery scientists have made regarding a mechanism that regulates the direction in which plants grow.

Starless Cloud Cores Reveal Why Some Stars are Bigger than Others:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The article explains that astronomers are trying to find out why stars outside our galaxy are so much larger based on what we know about star formation and chemical make-up. 

 

Volcano Power Plan Gets US Go-Ahead:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The text describes a group of researchers/investors who are attempting to convert the energy in volcanically heated water to electricity using a new method of forming more fissures to hold the heated water.

Salty Surprise: Ordinary Table Salt Turns into 'Forbidden' Forms:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. Scientists use normal table salt and expose it to extreme conditions to create new compounds that defy the classical rules of chemistry. These new compounds may help to produce better products with new applications and understand planetary cores.

Faster than the Speed of Light:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article discusses how neutrinos seem to be arriving at their destination slightly faster than mathematically calculated and describes how the discovery of new scientific evidence must undergo scrutiny from many angles before being accepted.

Snapshots Differentiate Molecules From Their Mirror Image:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes how scientists were able to reveal the spatial structure of left-handed and right-handed chiral molecules in gaseous solutions by using a combination of mass spectrometry and the Coulomb explosion. 

What is the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch?:

The article explains the ocean garbage patches: what causes them, what consequences to marine life result from their presence, and what we can do about them. This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

Plankton: Doing More than just Drifting Through:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes how "climate change around the world is having numerous impacts on the oceans, and a major concern is how plankton is being affected."

Sustainable Farming:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. By compiling information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this text briefly discusses the history of sustainable land use before moving into an in-depth discussion of the consequences of conventional farming and the ways sustainable farming might improve these conditions.

Stars:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article traces the evolution of the star by mass. It discusses white dwarfs, novas, supernovas, neutron stars, and black holes.

Is Time Travel Real? Physicists Say It Happens All The Time:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article is about the physics of time travel, including basic explanations of Einstein's relativity theories. The text investigates the plausibility of both "forward" and "backward" time travel using current scientific knowledge.

Hottest Temperature Ever Measured is a Negative One:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses the relationship between temperature and average molecular kinetic energy versus how scientists study particles at quantum scales. The paradox of a negative temperature being the hottest is discussed.

Scientists Now Uncertain About Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article reports on scientists" findings that refute an aspect of Heisenberg" uncertainty principle. The article describes the principle and what the new results mean for its future.

Oslo-Experiment May Explain Massive Star Explosions:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Some new findings about atomic nuclei may help astrophysicists create more realistic simulations of supernovae thus allowing us to see how heavier elements are formed in stars.

Scientific Laws and Theories:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses the differences between a scientific law and theory.

Can Science Win Over Climate Change Skeptics?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The author explains how to apply the nature and process of science to assertions made by climate change skeptics to teach about global warming.

Speech of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk to the Presidential Commission on Space Exploration:

This informational text, a transcript of a speech given by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk to the Presidential Commission on space exploration, is intended to support reading in the content area.

"Marjorie Stoneman Douglas Championed the Everglades, Her River of Grass":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article is a chronological narrative of Marjorie Stoneman Douglas's long relationship with the Everglades.

An excerpt from the Pulitzer Prize winning book, "Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.
The excerpted prologue is from the Pulitzer Prizewinning book Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer.

"The Riddle of the Human Species," a New York Times Opinionator blog by biologist E. O. Wilson :

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This New York Times Opinionator blog by one of the world's leading biologists is an explanation of the important role that "eusociality" has played in human evolution.

"Going Ballistic", an article previously published in "Natural History" magazine:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. In examining the term "ballistics," this article makes use of examples from Newtonian physics to talk about the orbits of planets, satellites, spacecraft, and galaxies.

"Galileo's Place in Science", an article from the website of the popular PBS science series "NOVA":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. It is an explanation of Galileo's most important contributions to science, posted on the website for the popular PBS TV series NOVA.

"Water is Life", article by award-winning author Barbara Kingsolver published in National Geographic:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. In this essay published in a National Geographic special issue on water, Barbara Kingsolver explains the link between climate change and diminishing freshwater resources on our planet.

"Cooking with Chemistry":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

This article from the Royal Society of Chemistry's Chemistry World magazine explains molecular gastronomy, a scientific discipline based on the physics and chemistry of cooking.

Excerpt from the book "Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression":

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

This is an excerpt from Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, a non-fiction winner of the National Book Award, in which the author explains different aspects of depression.

This excerpt is six paragraphs from pages 2 and 3 of the five page excerpt available on the ABC News website.

"What Do Scientific Studies Show?" an Opinionator Blog from The New York Times:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

It includes an explanation from a philosophy professor of what is wrong when the media reports on scientific results that are later called into question.

Tutorial

Name

Description

Scientific Method Tutorial and Virtual Experiment:

Site takes the student through a tutorial, then a virtual experiment designed to test the affect of various environmental variables on the rate of chirping in crickets. The steps in the tutorial and the experiment are - Define the Problem, Collect Information, Formulate a Hypothesis, Test the Hypothesis, and Draw a Conclusion.

Meiosis Tutorial:

This online tutorial is designed to help students understand the events that occur in process of meiosis.

Population Ecology:

In this interactive, explore one of the most well-understood mass seedings—that of oak-tree acorn crops—and its widespread effects on various animals in the ecosystem as well as on nearby human populations.

Linear Functions:

In this tutorial, "Linear functions of the form f(x) = ax + b and the properties of their graphs are explored interactively using an applet." The applet allows students to manipulate variables to discover the changes in intercepts and slope of the graphed line. There are six questions for students to answer, exploring the applet and observing changes. The questions' answers are included on this site. Additionally, a tutorial for graphing linear functions by hand is included.

Fitting A Line to Data:

Khan Academy tutorial video that uses Excel spreadsheet and actual income data to predict annual income and expresses
why lines and models are useful and interesting.

Using Literature Circles :

This web resource is a step-by-step guide to using Literature Circles in the classroom. While a specific lesson plan is not included, it is a clear guide for anyone wishing to incorporate this discussion strategy in the classroom.

Educational Software / Tool

Name

Description

Density: Sea Water Mixing & Sinking:

This is an excellent resource for teachers and students that provides student sheets, data graphs, vocabulary, and teacher notes as well as Big Ideas, Essential Questions, Data Tables, Formative Assessment questions - extremely teacher friendly who need assistance on this Big Idea and Concept. (The Preconceptions were helpful to my students.)

Free Graph Paper:

A variety of graph paper types for printing, including Cartesian, polar, engineering, isometric, logarithmic, hexagonal, probability, and Smith chart.

Resource Collection

Name

Description

South Florida Aquatic Environments:

This website's interactive content highlights three imperiled south Florida ecosystems: the Everglades, Florida Bay, and Florida Keys. Provides introduction, definition, and image of each habitat type within the ecosystems; outlines threats to ecosystems and conservation issues. Other features include: introduced species and their impacts; biological profiles for marine and freshwater fishes from the Florida Museum's ichthyology collection; and Florida-related word search and crossword puzzles.

Online Macromolecular Museum:

The Online Macromolecular Museum (OMM) is a site for the display and study of macromolecules. Macromolecular structures, as discovered by crystallographic or NMR methods, are scientific objects in much the same sense as fossil bones or dried specimens: they can be archived, studied, and displayed in aesthetically pleasing, educational exhibits. Hence, a museum seems an appropriate designation for the collection of displays that we are assembling. The OMM's exhibits are interactive tutorials on individual molecules in which hypertextual explanations of important biochemical features are linked to illustrative renderings of the molecule at hand.

Teaching Idea

Name

Description

Showdown at Crayfish Corral-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will be able to describe the concept of dominance and hierarchy displayed by other animals after observing dominance behavior displayed by crayfish.

CONPTT - SCIENCE vs NON-SCIENCE:

Explores six criteria of science (CONPTT), with definitions and self-check questions. Compares "Emerging Science", "Non-Science", and "Pseudoscience", with definitions and examples. Activity engages students in analyzing a collection of paragraphs to decide which category each fits into.

Island of Stability:

A video and supporting activities about the Periodic Table. The context is man's quest to create elements. The focus is atomic structure and atomic theory.

Genetic Science Learning Center - University of Utah:

A variety of resources, useful in teaching genetics and cell science are available at this site. For example: Genetic Technology Interactive Explorations and Resources; Virtual Labs on the topics of DNA Extraction, PCR, Gel electrophoresis, and DNA Microarrays; The Basics - Overview; Online Tutorials Focusing on Health; Genetic Disorders Library; and Molecular Genealogy.

Dihybrid Cross-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

The student will calculate a dihybrid cross and interpret the results.

Transcribe and Translate a Gene:

See how cells "read" the information in a DNA sequence to build a protein, then build one yourself!

Translation Activity-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will identify the steps involved in the translation process.

Transcription and Translation Using Edible Models Lesson Plan:

The purpose of this lesson is to convey to the students that the cell is not static. The proteins, which function as the structure and the machinery of the cell, must be constantly manufactured in order to support the cell's life processes. Through the processes of transcription and translation, which are described in this lesson, the genetic code in the cell is decoded in order to construct these proteins.

During this lesson, the students will be introduced to the "big picture" of protein synthesis through a hands-on activity in which they transcribe an mRNA sequence from a DNA sequence, and then translate a protein from that mRNA sequence. Finally, they will explore the evolutionary and regulatory reasons for the processes described by the Central Dogma.

Comparing and Contrasting Mitosis and Meiosis:

This step-by-animations explores the stages of two types of cell division, mitosis and meiosis, and how these processes are compared and contrasted to one another and provides a printable version.

Raptor Population Ecology-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will calculate population size, carrying capacity, annual change in population size, and maximum rate of population increase of different raptor species.

Endangered Species Worldwide:

Students will be able to use a world map or globe to locate the distribution of at least 10 endangered species and describe the current threats and conservation efforts concerning one endangered species of animal or plant.

Fur Seal Survey-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Given a current environmental situation, the student will be able to gather information, organize, analyze, and present data. They will participate in a decision-making process.

Lagoon Debate-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Given a common environmental situation, students will research available literature or other resources for more information, and logically argue a viewpoint. They will be able to demonstrate a real-life decision-making process and evaluate its outcome.

Manatees on the 'Net-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will use the Internet to determine the population status of the Florida manatee and will use the information to debate the extinction or recovery of the manatee.

Polar Opposites-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will be able to understand the effects of introducing geographically non-native species to a new environment.

Demonstration of Cheese-Making Enzyme Magic:

This is a classroom demonstration of enzyme action on milk.

Echolocation and Density-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will solve density problems.

Box Plot:

In this activity, students use preset data or enter in their own data to be represented in a box and whisker plot. This activity allows students to explore single as well as side-by-side box and whisker plots of different data. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the Java applet.

Stem-and-Leaf Plots:

This lesson is designed to introduce students to stem-and-leaf plots as a graphical way to represent a data set. The lesson also reviews measures of central tendency with directions for finding mean, median, and mode are given. This lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to stem-and-leaf plots as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one.

Facilitating a Socratic Seminar with the play "The Piano Lesson" by August Wilson:

This teaching idea guides students in generating questions for a student led seminar based on their reading of August Wilson's play, "The Piano Lesson". Students will then use their questions to conduct a Socratic Seminar about the play.

Decoding the Matrix: Exploring Dystopian Characteristics through Film:

In this lesson, students are introduced to the definition and characteristics of a dystopian work by watching video clips from The Matrix and other dystopian films. They first explore the definition and characteristics of utopian and dystopian societies, and then compare and contrast the two using a Venn diagram online tool. Next, they identify the protagonist in clips from The Matrix and then discuss how the clips extend and confirm their understanding of a dystopia. Students then view additional film clips and identify which characteristics of a dystopian society the clip is intended to portray. Finally, they explore how they can apply their knowledge about dystopias to future readings.

Researching the Argument:

In this teaching idea from Where the Classroom Ends, students research a Supreme Court case and present their arguments. A class is divided into two teams, petitioner and respondent. In order to provide each team with research focus and purpose, both teams are assigned specific roles to guide their research. These roles can include researching the oral arguments presented to the Supreme Court, similar cases, the path the case took to the Supreme Court, and the language of the amendments. Dependent upon the level of students, teachers can provide students with sources such as news articles, op-eds, and letters to the editor. Students should infer as many details about the topic as possible from the sources provided. Additionally, consider asking students about what argument about the topic emerges from all of the sources. This causes them to think about the relationship between the sources and develop a cohesive and well-supported argument. As a culminating activity, have both sides debate the case as if they are presenting to the Supreme Court.

Analyzing Grammar Pet Peeves:

This teaching idea is designed to help students analyze grammar pet peeves. Students begin by thinking about their own grammar pet peeves and then read a "Dear Abby" column in which she lists several grammar pet peeves of her own. Students become aware that attitudes about race, social class, moral and ethical character and 'proper' language use are intertwined and that rants such as this one reveal those attitudes. Finally, students discuss the pet peeves as a class while gaining an understanding that issues of race, class, combined with audience expectations, help to determine what is considered 'proper' language use.

Reading Strategy: Reciprocal Teaching Using a News Article on Citizenship:

This USA Today activity is perfect for combining Language Arts and Civics' lessons for close-reading of higher levels of text complexity appropriate to grade-bands. The activity uses cross curricular skill areas—reading/writing, speaking/listening—as students engage in close-reading activities, analysis of test questions, and formation of new test questions.

Plagiarism: A Student's Guide to Recognizing It and Avoiding It:

This is a guide to help students understand different kinds of plagiarism so that they can avoid plagiarism in their own writing. Sample texts which illustrate each of the primary plagiarism categories that persistently challenge many students are provided. 

Interracial "Harmony" and the Great Awakening:

The students will be introduced to two episodes in 19th century American history, around the time of the Great Awakening, that show glimpses of some positive and negative consequences of interracial interaction in a religious context. The students will examine primary sources from the Documenting the American South collection to then be able to write a "sermon" from the perspective of a southern itinerant preacher during the Great Awakening arguing for or against religion as a cure for the social ill of racism and slavery.

Professional Development

Name

Description

The Nature of Science: Presenting Lessons for Maximum Effect & Dispelling Popular Myths :

The webmaster for the ENSI web site (http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb), a popular repository for Nature of Science Lessons, describes some educational philosophy about teaching the Nature of Science, including dispelling some teacher-held misconceptions.

Lesson Study

Name

Description

Exploring Diversity and Evolution: A Lesson Study Resource Kit for grades 9-12:

This lesson study resource kit is designed to support lesson study teams in developing a unit of instruction for students in grades 9-12 on the topic of diversity and evolution.

Diversity and Evolution: An NGSSS-based biology toolkit for grades 9-12:

This toolkit supports the development of an instructional unit on diversity and evolution and aligns with Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for science as well as Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics for students in grades 9-12. The elements of this toolkit were assembled based upon their suitability for constructing a multi-day instructional unit on hominid evolution that corresponds with the 5E Learning Cycle of engage, explore, explain, elaborate, and evaluate. Your task as a lesson study team is to analyze the materials that are included in this toolkit and evaluate how they can be incorporated in a 5-E instructional unit plan that complies with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics. As you study these resources it is important to make note of any deficiencies or gaps that will need to be addressed and make modifications in the lesson resources and activities where needed.

 

Student Resources

Title

Description

Introduction to the Microscope:

Students will learn about the proper use and handling of the compound microscope.

Scientific Method Tutorial and Virtual Experiment:

Site takes the student through a tutorial, then a virtual experiment designed to test the affect of various environmental variables on the rate of chirping in crickets. The steps in the tutorial and the experiment are - Define the Problem, Collect Information, Formulate a Hypothesis, Test the Hypothesis, and Draw a Conclusion.

Anolis Lizards of the Greater Antilles: Using phylogeny to test hypotheses :

Students "take a trip" to the Greater Antilles to figure out how the Anolis lizards on the islands might have evolved. They begin by observing the body structures and habitat of different species, then plot this data on a map of the islands to look for patterns in their distribution. From the patterns they observe, students develop alternative hypotheses about how these lizards colonized the islands and evolved. To test their hypotheses, they are given a phylogeny which they color code according to their previous data. By combining both types of data, students make a final hypothesis about how they think the lizards colonized the islands.

Vitamin B1 - Chicken Farm Game:

This game is based on the 1929 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded for pointing out a substance in rice skin, which was later discovered to be vitamin B1, is missing from the diet of patients with the disease beriberi.

Island of Stability:

A video and supporting activities about the Periodic Table. The context is man's quest to create elements. The focus is atomic structure and atomic theory.

Beer's Law Lab:

This activity will allow the students to make colorful concentrated and dilute solutions and explore how much light they absorb and transmit using a virtual spectrophotometer.
Some of the learning goals can be:

  • Describe the relationships between volume and amount of solute to solution concentration.
  • Explain qualitatively the relationship between solution color and concentration.
  • Predict and explain how solution concentration will change for adding or removing: water, solute, and/or solution.
  • Calculate the concentration of solutions in units of molarity (mol/L).
  • Design a procedure for creating a solution of a given concentration.
  • Identify when a solution is saturated and predict how concentration will change for adding or removing: water, solute, and/or solution.
  • Describe the relationship between the solution concentration and the intensity of light that is absorbed/transmitted.
  • Describe the relationship between absorbance, molar absorptivity, path length, and concentration in Beer's Law.
  • Predict how the intensity of light absorbed/transmitted will change with changes in solution type, solution concentration, container width, or light source and explain why?

Reactions Rates:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore what makes a reaction happen by colliding atoms and molecules. They will be able to design their own experiments with different reactions, concentrations, and temperatures. They will also be able to recognize what affect the rate of a reaction.

Some of the sample learning goals can be: 

  • Explain why and how a pinball shooter can be used to help understand ideas about reactions.
  • Describe on a microscopic level what contributes to a successful reaction.
  • Describe how the reaction coordinate can be used to predict whether a reaction will proceed or slow.
  • Use the potential energy diagram to determine : The activation energy for the forward and reverse reactions; The difference in energy between reactants and products; The relative potential energies of the molecules at different positions on a reaction coordinate.
  • Draw a potential energy diagram from the energies of reactants and products and activation energy.
  • Predict how raising or lowering the temperature will affect a system in the equilibrium.

Molarity:


This virtual manipulative will help the students understand what determines the concentration of a solution. They will learn about the relationships between moles, liters and molarity by adjusting the amount of solute, and solution volume. Students can change solutes to compare different chemical compounds in water.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Describe the relationships between volume and amount of solute to concentration
  • Explain how solution color and concentration are related.
  • Calculate the concentration of solutions in units of molarity (mol/L)
  • Compare solubility limits between solutes.

Step Growth Polymerization:


This activity will help the students learn about the polymerization. The process of polymerization can be classified into two categories: Chain growth polymerization and step growth polymerization. In this activity students will understand the process of step growth polymerization in which bi-functional or multi-functional monomers react to form polymers.

Catalysis:


This interactive animation presented here helps in understanding the concept of catalysis, which is defined as the process of accelerating the process of chemical reaction with the use of a catalyst. This visual conceptualization will provide the students with the opportunity to test their knowledge and understanding about the concepts.

Hardy-Weinberg Principle:

This video describes the Hardy-Weinberg Principle. It is fairly entertaining mostly due to the narration of the instructor.

Natural Selection:

Students will explore natural selection by controlling the environment and causing mutations in bunnies. This will demonstrate how natural selection works in nature. They will have the opportunity to throw in different variables to see what will make their species of rabbit survive.

Variation in a Species:

The video describes how variation can be introduced into a species.

Peppered Moths: Natural Selection in Black and White:

This is an interactive resource that illustrates the classic peppered moth natural selection model. It includes interactive lesson, activity, and history.

EvoDots - Software for Evolutionary Analysis:

The software application, which allows the students to simulate natural selection in a population of dots, goes along with a tutorial which is also at this site.

Pocket Mouse Evolution:

This simulation shows the spread of a favorable mutation through a population of pocket mice. Even a small selective advantage can lead to a rapid evolution of the population.

Evolution Clarification:

This video describes evolution and what might cause it.

Sex-Linked Traits:

This video describes the chromosomal basis for gender and sex-linked traits.

Dragon Genetics -- Independent Assortment and Gene Linkage :

This is a lab/activity that uses dragons as "research subjects" for genetics research. It highlights independent assortment as well as gene linkage. Students will do the first part of the activity using independent assortment (genes on different chromosomes). The second part of the activity looks at genes on the same chromosome, and how linkage plays a part in allele assortment. It can be used to show how crossing over allows increased variation when involving linked genes.

Worksheets are available in both Word and PDF formats, for both teacher and student. There is an additional dragon genetics lab that illustrates the principles of Mendelian genetics as a whole.

Lab: Mendelian Inheritance:

  • Provides a historical background about Gregor Mendel, the father of Genetics
  • Lists the rules of inheritance
  • Contains an interactive activity for making a pedigree

Genetic Science Learning Center - University of Utah:

A variety of resources, useful in teaching genetics and cell science are available at this site. For example: Genetic Technology Interactive Explorations and Resources; Virtual Labs on the topics of DNA Extraction, PCR, Gel electrophoresis, and DNA Microarrays; The Basics - Overview; Online Tutorials Focusing on Health; Genetic Disorders Library; and Molecular Genealogy.

Norn Genetics:

This is a simplified, interactive demonstration of genetic principles. Using a fictional species named the Norn, students can predict the outcome of genetic crosses (mono and di-hybrid, sex-linked, and multiple-allele). This could be used to strengthen the students understanding of genetics, practice Punnet squares, or practice calculation of genotypic/phenotypic ratios. However, it is unlikely to be useful as an independent assignment (if used as designed).

Virtual Lab: Punnett Squares:

In this resource, students can watch a short video to better understand Punnett Squares, then practice their understanding with the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, scenarios are presented using flies where the student has to determine the genotypes of the parent flies based on the information given. Once the parent genotypes are entered correctly, the student then has to determine the genotype and phenotype combinations in the Punnett Square.

DNA: Animations:

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute makes available twenty-five short, narrated animations about DNA at this link. The animations are viewable as video clips and topics include, but are not limited to DNA structure, DNA replication, transcription and translation, mutations in DNA, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and shotgun sequencing.

DNA WebQuest:

This resource directs users to interactive games and tutorials on the topics of DNA replication, transcription, translation, gene expression, and mutation.

DNA-The Double Helix:


In this interactive game, the students will understand how a DNA molecule is built up, how the copies of the DNA molecule made and what is the meaning of base-pairing. The job of the students in this game is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching the base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

DNA Polymerase:


In this activity students will recognize that DNA polymerase is responsible for the process of DNA replication, during which a double-stranded DNA molecule is copied into two identical DNA molecules. DNA ploymerase catalyze the polymerization of deoxyribonucleotides alongside a DNA strand, which they read and use as a template. The newly-polymerized molecule is complementary to the template strand.

DNA - The Double Helix Game:

DNA is the genetic material of all known living organisms and some viruses. DNA contains two stands wrapped around each other in a helix, and these stands are held in place by four chemicals called bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The bases pair up with each other in a specific manner to form units called base pairs - adenine always pairs with thymine, and cytosine always pairs with guanine.
In this game your job is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

Nucleotides Games:

This fun game requires the students to locate and destroy the nucleotide indicated in the box at the bottom right of the screen. The students are required to select the correct molecular structure for each of the nucleotides and gain the points.

Exploring Mutant Organisms:

  • Interviews with expert scientists about the genome and mutant organisms
  • Examples on model organisms used in genome research
  • Animation explaining how mutations occur

Transcribe and Translate a Gene:

See how cells "read" the information in a DNA sequence to build a protein, then build one yourself!

DNA to Protein:

This website contains many interactive activities that can be used by students to gain an understanding of translation and transcription.

Photosynthesis animation and other cell processes in animation:

This site has fantastic short Flash animations of intricate cell processes, including photosynthesis and the electron transport chain.

Translation:

A detailed depiction of translation, the second stage of protein synthesis. This is the third in a series of three animations on protein synthesis.

Translation: Making a protein from a messenger RNA:


The genes in DNA encode protein molecules. Expressing a gene means manufacturing its corresponding protein.Translation is the key process of making a protein from the genetic code expresses in the DNA. In translation, messenger RNA is read according to the genetic code, which relates the DNA sequence to the amino acid sequence in proteins. This virtual manipulative will allow the students to understand the process of translation. Students will also get a chance to observe, what happens when a new random mutation generates stop codons.

Protein Synthesis:

This visual tutorial of the complex biochemical process helps the student to understand the process of protein synthesis. This manipulative gives the students detailed information starting with the basics of genetic codes called codons. Next, the lesson then leads the students towards detailed information of mRNA, tRNA and rRNAs. The final phase helps students by describing the complete process of protein synthesis from initiation, to elongation and then to termination. The tutorial offers check questions at every stage to ensure students are learning the important information.

Build a GeneNetwork:


The lac operon is a set of genes which are responsible for the metabolism of lactose in some bacterial cells. Students will explore the effects of mutation within the lac operon by adding or removing genes from the DNA.

  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the various genes and DNA control elements are mutated (added or removed).
  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the concentration of lactose is changed.
  • Explain the roles of Lacl, LacZ, and LacY in lactose regulation.

Viruses:

This videos discusses how viruses work.

Bacteria:

This video discusses how bacteria spread and the pros and cons of bacteria.

Lab: Bacterial Transformation:

  • This activity provides a historical background about research related to bacterial analysis
  • Contains an animation that shows how enzymes work on cutting DNA strands

The Tuberculosis Experiments and Discoveries Game:

This game explores the 1905 Novel prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for investigations and discoveries concerning the disease tuberculosis or "TB." The game is a sort of old fashioned laboratory simulation and allows students to discover and experience some of the classic methods used to detect whether a specific bacterium causes a disease.

Cancer:

This video gives an introduction to what cancer is and how it is the by-product of the replication of broken DNA.

Cancer and the Cell Cycle:

The National Institute of Health website provides a set of short animations of the cell cycle and cancer growth.

The Control of the Cell Cycle:

The Control of the Cell Cycle educational game is based on the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for discoveries concerning the control of the cell cycle.

DNA Extraction Virtual Lab:

In this interactive Biotechniques virtual lab, you will isolate DNA from a human test subject and learn the uses for DNA obtained through extraction. The "Try It Yourself" section below the virtual lab gives instruction and background information about how to extract DNA from living tissue using basic materials available in grocery stores.

Lab: DNA Extraction:

  • Background on the discovery of the DNA double helix
  • Contains an interactive activity for base pairing
  • Contains an interactive activity for DNA extraction

Lab: DNA Fingerprint: Alu:

  • Background on tracking human ancestry using the alu marker
  • Animation on polymerase chain reaction, PCR
  • Interactive activity for performing PCR

Lab: Restriction Analysis:

  • An interactive exercise for using agarose gel electrophoresis for separating DNA molecules
  • Explain how restriction endonucleases is used in restriction analysis of DNA

Centre of the Cell: Mitosis Interactive:

In this interactive, students order stages of mitosis. Each stage is represented by a short video of a real cell undergoing that phase of mitosis and a short description of the events. Students order the videos to create a short video of mitosis.

Phases of Mitosis:

This video discusses the phases of mitosis.

Mitosis:

This website provides an interactive demonstration of a cell going through the different stages of mitosis. You can progress through each stage at your own pace, or watch as the process unfolds before your eyes. The demonstration also has a description of what happens in each phase of mitosis, from interphase through cytokenesis.

Control of the Cell Cycle Game:

This game is about the different phases in ordinary cell division, mitosis. Between each phase there are several "check points" to make sure that nothing happened to the genetic material on the way.

Phases of Meiosis:

This video discusses the phases of meiosis in detail.

Mitosis, Meiosis and Sexual Reproduction:

This video describes mitosis and meiosis as it relates to sexual reproduction.

Comparing and Contrasting Mitosis and Meiosis:

This step-by-animations explores the stages of two types of cell division, mitosis and meiosis, and how these processes are compared and contrasted to one another and provides a printable version.

Meiosis Tutorial:

This online tutorial is designed to help students understand the events that occur in process of meiosis.

Population Ecology:

In this interactive, explore one of the most well-understood mass seedings—that of oak-tree acorn crops—and its widespread effects on various animals in the ecosystem as well as on nearby human populations.

Plant vs. Predator:

Ecologist Daniel Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania describes how this plant's strategy came about and what's in it—both good and bad—for the bamboo, the rats and other predators, and anyone living nearby.

Silent Invaders:

This website includes background text information and an interactive activity where students attempt to eradicate the extremely destructive musk thistle in the most ecologically but practical way. Ten plant and ten animal species are featured. The 20 species presented are responsible for about 95% of the damage by invasive species in North America.

Mount St. Helens: Rising From the Ashes :

In this NSF video and reading selection evolutionary biologist and ecologist John Bishop documents the return of living things to Mount St. Helens after the largest landslide in recorded history. This is a rare opportunity for scientists to get to study a devastated area and how it comes back from scratch in such detail.

South Florida Aquatic Environments:

This website's interactive content highlights three imperiled south Florida ecosystems: the Everglades, Florida Bay, and Florida Keys. Provides introduction, definition, and image of each habitat type within the ecosystems; outlines threats to ecosystems and conservation issues. Other features include: introduced species and their impacts; biological profiles for marine and freshwater fishes from the Florida Museum's ichthyology collection; and Florida-related word search and crossword puzzles.

Macromolecules:

This web resource is a tutorial on macromolecules. It provides some reading material on the topic and also includes animations and a quiz.

Traffic Jam:

This resource poses the question, "how many vehicles might be involved in a traffic jam 12 miles long?"

This task, while involving relatively simple arithmetic, promps students to practice modeling (MP4), work with units and conversion (N-Q.1), and develop a new unit (N-Q.2). Students will also consider the appropriate level of accuracy to use in their conclusions (N-Q.3).

Felicia's Drive:

This task provides students the opportunity to make use of units to find the gas need (N-Q.1). It also requires them to make some sensible approximations (e.g., 2.92 gallons is not a good answer to part (a)) and to recognize that Felicia's situation requires her to round up. Various answers to (a) are possible, depending on how much students think is a safe amount for Felicia to have left in the tank when she arrives at the gas station. The key point is for them to explain their choices. This task provides an opportunity for students to practice MP2, Reason abstractly and quantitatively, and MP3, Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Harvesting the Fields:

This is a challenging task, suitable for extended work, and reaching into a deep understanding of units. The task requires students to exhibit MP1, Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. An algebraic solution is possible but complicated; a numerical solution is both simpler and more sophisticated, requiring skilled use of units and quantitative reasoning. Thus the task aligns with either A-CED.1 or N-Q.1, depending on the approach.

How Much is a Penny Worth?:

This task asks students to calculate the cost of materials to make a penny, utilizing rates of grams of copper.

Runners' World:

This task provides students with an opportunity to engage in Standard for Mathematical Practice 6, attending to precision. It intentionally omits some relevant information -- namely, that a typical soda can holds 12 oz of fluid, that a pound is equivalent to 16 dry ounces, and that an ounce of water weighs approximately 1.04 dry ounces (at the temperature of the human body) -- in the interest of having students discover that these are relevant quantities. The incompleteness of the problem statement makes the task more amenable to having students do work in groups.

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Weed killer:

The principal purpose of the task is to explore a real-world application problem with algebra, working with units and maintaining reasonable levels of accuracy throughout. Of particular interest is that the optimal solution for long-term purchasing of the active ingredient is achieved by purchasing bottle C, whereas minimizing total cost for a particular application comes from purchasing bottle B. Students might need the instructor's aid to see that this is just the observation that buying in bulk may not be a better deal if the extra bulk will go unused.

Fuel Efficiency:

The problem requires students to not only convert miles to kilometers and gallons to liters but they also have to deal with the added complication of finding the reciprocal at some point.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating II:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating I:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Bus and Car:

This task operates at two levels. In part it is a simple exploration of the relationship between speed, distance, and time. Part (c) requires understanding of the idea of average speed, and gives an opportunity to address the common confusion between average speed and the average of the speeds for the two segments of the trip.

At a higher level, the task addresses N-Q.3, since realistically neither the car nor the bus is going to travel at exactly the same speed from beginning to end of each segment; there is time traveling through traffic in cities, and even on the autobahn the speed is not constant. Thus students must make judgements about the level of accuracy with which to report the result.

Calories in a Sports Drink:

This problem involves the meaning of numbers found on labels. When the level of accuracy is not given we need to make assumptions based on how the information is reported. An unexpected surprise awaits in this case, however, as no reasonable interpretation of the level of accuracy makes sense of the information reported on the bottles in parts (b) and (c). Either a miscalculation has been made or the numbers have been rounded in a very odd way.

Dinosaur Bones:

The purpose of this task is to illustrate through an absurd example the fact that in real life quantities are reported to a certain level of accuracy, and it does not make sense to treat them as having greater accuracy.

Function Flyer:

In this online tool, students input a function where the constants, coefficients, and exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. This tool allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Using tabs at the top of the page you can also access supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Data Flyer:

In this activity, students input a function where the constants, coefficients, and exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. Students can also input data points to be graphed in the same window. This activity allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Students can also practice adjusting the parameters of an equation in order to find a function representation of their data. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Slope Slider:

In this activity, students adjust slider bars, which adjust the coefficients and constants of a linear function, and examine how their changes affect the graph. The equation of the line can be in slope-intercept form or standard form. This activity allows students to explore linear equations, slopes, and y-intercepts and their visual representation on a graph. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Linear Functions:

In this tutorial, "Linear functions of the form f(x) = ax + b and the properties of their graphs are explored interactively using an applet." The applet allows students to manipulate variables to discover the changes in intercepts and slope of the graphed line. There are six questions for students to answer, exploring the applet and observing changes. The questions' answers are included on this site. Additionally, a tutorial for graphing linear functions by hand is included.

The Canoe Trip, Variation 1:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice constructing functions that represent a quantity of interest in a context, and then interpreting features of the function in the light of the context. It can be used as either an assessment or a teaching task.

The Canoe Trip, Variation 2:

The primary purpose of this task is to lead students to a numerical and graphical understanding of the behavior of a rational function near a vertical asymptote, in terms of the expression defining the function.

Average Cost:

This task asks students to find the average, write an equation, find the domain, and create a graph of the cost of producing DVDs.

How is the Weather?:

This task can be used as a quick assessment to see if students can make sense of a graph in the context of a real world situation. Students also have to pay attention to the scale on the vertical axis to find the correct match. The first and third graphs look very similar at first glance, but the function values are very different since the scales on the vertical axis are very different. The task could also be used to generate a group discussion on interpreting functions given by graphs.

Logistic Growth Model, Abstract Version:

This task is for instructional purposes only and students should already be familiar with some specific examples of logistic growth functions. The goal of this task is to have students appreciate how different constants influence the shape of a graph.

Logistic Growth Model, Explicit Version:

This problem introduces a logistic growth model in the concrete settings of estimating the population of the U.S. The model gives a surprisingly accurate estimate and this should be contrasted with linear and exponential models.

Telling a Story with Graphs:

In this task students are given graphs of quantities related to weather. The purpose of the task is to show that graphs are more than a collection of coordinate points, that they can tell a story about the variables that are involved and together they can paint a very complete picture of a situation, in this case the weather. Features in one graph, like maximum and minimum points correspond to features in another graph, for example on a rainy day the solar radiation is very low and the cumulative rainfall graph is increasing with a large slope.

Throwing Baseballs:

This task could be used for assessment or for practice. It allows the students to compare characteristics of two quadratic functions that are each represented differently, one as the graph of a quadratic function and one written out algebraically. Specifically, we are asking the students to determine which function has the greatest maximum and the greatest non-negative root.

Warming and Cooling:

This task is meant to be a straight-forward assessment task of graph reading and interpreting skills. This task helps reinforce the idea that when a variable represents time, t = 0 is chosen as an arbitrary point in time and positive times are interpreted as times that happen after that.

As the Wheel Turns:

In this task, students use trigonometric functions to model the movement of a point around a wheel and, through space. Students also interpret features of graphs in terms of the given real-world context.

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Tool to Exploring Exponential Functions:

An interactive applet in which students or teachers can visualize how changes in the parameters of the exponential function, y = a(b) x + c, affect the shape of the graph.

Curve Fitting:

The students will plot points on a graph and watch as a polynomial is made.

Equation Grapher:

This interactive simulation investigates graphing linear and quadratic equations. Users are given the ability to define and change the coefficients and constants in order to observe resulting changes in the graph(s).

Graphing Equations:

This resource repeatedly provides a sample linear function in standard form and asks the user to graph it on an interactive graph below the problem. The interactive graphing tool provides immediate feedback on the solution to the problem whether the user graphs it correctly or not.

Quadratic Functions:

This worksheet gives students one place to show all transformations (reflections, vertical stretches/compressions, and translations) for the quadratic function. The worksheet also has a place for domain and range for each transformation.

Graphs of Quadratic Functions:

Students compare graphs of different quadratic functions, then produce equations of their own to satisfy given conditions.

This exploration can be done in class near the beginning of a unit on graphing parabolas. Students need to be familiar with intercepts, and need to know what the vertex is. It is effective after students have graphed parabolas in vertex form (y=a(x–h)2+k), but have not yet explored graphing other forms.

Graphs of Power Functions:

This task requires students to recognize the graphs of different (positive) powers of x.

Archimedes and the King's Crown:

This problem solving task uses the tale of Archimedes and the King of Syracuse's crown to determine the volume and mass of gold and silver.

Eratosthenes and the circumference of the earth:

This problem solving task gives an interesting context for implementing ideas from geometry and trigonometry.

How many cells are in the human body?:

This problem solving task challenges students to apply the concepts of mass, volume, and density in the real-world context to find how many cells are in the human body.

How many leaves on a tree?:

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How many leaves on a tree? (Version 2):

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How thick is a soda can? I:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the surface area of a soda can, calculate how many cubic centimeters of aluminum it contains, and estimate how thick it is.

How thick is a soda can? II:

This problem solving task asks students to explain which measurements are needed to estimate the thickness of a soda can.

Histogram Tool:

This virtual manipulative histogram tool can aid in analyzing the distribution of a dataset. It has 6 preset datasets and a function to add your own data for analysis.

Box Plot:

In this activity, students use preset data or enter in their own data to be represented in a box and whisker plot. This activity allows students to explore single as well as side-by-side box and whisker plots of different data. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the Java applet.

Histogram:

In this activity, students input data to be represented in a histogram. Students can adjust the interval size using a slider bar and they can also adjust the other scales on the graph. This activity allows students to explore histograms as a way to represent data as well as the concepts of mean, standard deviation, and scale. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Advanced Data Grapher:

This is an online graphing utility that is a great supplement to any lesson on graphing box plots, bubble graphs, scatterplots, histograms, and stem-and-leaf plots.

Random Walk III:

The task provides a context to calculate discrete probabilities and represent them on a bar graph.

Speed Trap:

The purpose of this task is to allow students to demonstrate an ability to construct boxplots and to use boxplots as the basis for comparing distributions.

Haircut Costs:

This problem could be used as an introductory lesson to introduce group comparisons and to engage students in a question they may find amusing and interesting.

Normal Distribution Interactive Activity:

With this online tool, students adjust the standard deviation and sample size of a normal distribution to see how it will affect a histogram of that distribution. This activity allows students to explore the effect of changing the sample size in an experiment and the effect of changing the standard deviation of a normal distribution. Tabs at the top of the page provide access to supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Do You Fit In This Car?:

This task requires students to use the normal distribution as a model for a data distribution. Students must use given means and standard deviations to approximate population percentages.

Should We Send Out a Certificate?:

The purpose of this task is to have students complete normal distribution calculations and to use properties of normal distributions to draw conclusions.

SAT Scores:

This problem solving task challenges students to answer probability questions about SAT scores, using distribution and mean to solve the problem.

Musical Preferences:

This problem solving task asks students to make deductions about what kind of music students like by examining a table with data.

Fitting A Line to Data:

Khan Academy tutorial video that uses Excel spreadsheet and actual income data to predict annual income and expresses
why lines and models are useful and interesting.

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.

Speed of Light in Transparent Materials:

  • Study the relation between the speed of light and the refractive index of the medium it passes through
  • Choose from a collection of materials with known refractive indices and obtain the speed of light as it passes through
  • Learn why light-years are used as an astronomical measurement of distance.

Reflection of Light:

  • Use Snell's Law (also called the Law of Refraction) to show why the angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence for a plane mirror
  • Compare incident angles to reflected angles
  • Observe the reflection process for light beams of different wavelengths hitting a flat surface at different incident angles

Refraction of Light:

  • Observe the refraction of light as it passes from one medium to another
  • Study the relation between refraction of light and the refractive index of the medium
  • Select from a list of materials with different refractive indices
  • Change the light beam from white to monochromatic and observe the difference

Human Eye Accommodation:

  • Observe how the eye's muscles change the shape of the lens in accordance with the distance to the object being viewed
  • Indicate the parts of the eye that are responsible for vision
  • View how images are formed in the eye

Concave Spherical Mirrors:

  • Learn how a concave spherical mirror generates an image
  • Observe how the size and position of the image changes with the object distance from the mirror
  • Learn the difference between a real image and a virtual image
  • Learn some applications of concave mirrors

Convex Spherical Mirrors:

  • Learn how a convex mirror forms the image of an object
  • Understand why convex mirrors form small virtual images
  • Observe the change in size and position of the image with the change in object's distance from the mirror
  • Learn some practical applications of convex mirrors

Color Temperature in a Virtual Radiator:

  • Observe the change of color of a black body radiator upon changes in temperature
  • Understand that at 0 Kelvin or Absolute Zero there is no molecular motion

Solar Cell Operation:

  • Observe how a solar cell converts light energy into electrical energy
  • Learn about the different components of the solar cell
  • Observe the relationship between photon intensity and amount of electrical energy produced
  • Understand the development of solar cell technology over the past half century

Geometrical Construction of Ray Diagrams:

  • Learn to trace the path of propagating light waves using geometrical optics
  • Observe the effect of changing parameters such as focal length, object dimensions and position on image properties
  • Learn the equations used in determining the size and locations of images formed by thin lenses

Electromagnetic Wave Propagation:

  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Basic Electromagnetic Wave Properties:

  • Explore the relationship between wavelength, frequency, amplitude and energy of an electromagnetic wave
  • Compare the characteristics of waves of different wavelengths

Observing Objects in Water:

  • Explore how objects in water seem to be closer to the surface of a water body than they really are, when viewed from land
  • Visually differentiate between the image seen by the eye and the actual position of the object
  • Adjust the water depth to demonstrate the changes in the position of the virtual image
  • Explain that refraction takes place when light rays pass from one medium to another

 

Parent Resources

Title

Description

Scientific Method Tutorial and Virtual Experiment:

Site takes the student through a tutorial, then a virtual experiment designed to test the affect of various environmental variables on the rate of chirping in crickets. The steps in the tutorial and the experiment are - Define the Problem, Collect Information, Formulate a Hypothesis, Test the Hypothesis, and Draw a Conclusion.

Vitamin B1 - Chicken Farm Game:

This game is based on the 1929 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded for pointing out a substance in rice skin, which was later discovered to be vitamin B1, is missing from the diet of patients with the disease beriberi.

Beer's Law Lab:

This activity will allow the students to make colorful concentrated and dilute solutions and explore how much light they absorb and transmit using a virtual spectrophotometer.
Some of the learning goals can be:

  • Describe the relationships between volume and amount of solute to solution concentration.
  • Explain qualitatively the relationship between solution color and concentration.
  • Predict and explain how solution concentration will change for adding or removing: water, solute, and/or solution.
  • Calculate the concentration of solutions in units of molarity (mol/L).
  • Design a procedure for creating a solution of a given concentration.
  • Identify when a solution is saturated and predict how concentration will change for adding or removing: water, solute, and/or solution.
  • Describe the relationship between the solution concentration and the intensity of light that is absorbed/transmitted.
  • Describe the relationship between absorbance, molar absorptivity, path length, and concentration in Beer's Law.
  • Predict how the intensity of light absorbed/transmitted will change with changes in solution type, solution concentration, container width, or light source and explain why?

Reactions Rates:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore what makes a reaction happen by colliding atoms and molecules. They will be able to design their own experiments with different reactions, concentrations, and temperatures. They will also be able to recognize what affect the rate of a reaction.

Some of the sample learning goals can be: 

  • Explain why and how a pinball shooter can be used to help understand ideas about reactions.
  • Describe on a microscopic level what contributes to a successful reaction.
  • Describe how the reaction coordinate can be used to predict whether a reaction will proceed or slow.
  • Use the potential energy diagram to determine : The activation energy for the forward and reverse reactions; The difference in energy between reactants and products; The relative potential energies of the molecules at different positions on a reaction coordinate.
  • Draw a potential energy diagram from the energies of reactants and products and activation energy.
  • Predict how raising or lowering the temperature will affect a system in the equilibrium.

Molarity:


This virtual manipulative will help the students understand what determines the concentration of a solution. They will learn about the relationships between moles, liters and molarity by adjusting the amount of solute, and solution volume. Students can change solutes to compare different chemical compounds in water.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Describe the relationships between volume and amount of solute to concentration
  • Explain how solution color and concentration are related.
  • Calculate the concentration of solutions in units of molarity (mol/L)
  • Compare solubility limits between solutes.

Step Growth Polymerization:


This activity will help the students learn about the polymerization. The process of polymerization can be classified into two categories: Chain growth polymerization and step growth polymerization. In this activity students will understand the process of step growth polymerization in which bi-functional or multi-functional monomers react to form polymers.

Catalysis:


This interactive animation presented here helps in understanding the concept of catalysis, which is defined as the process of accelerating the process of chemical reaction with the use of a catalyst. This visual conceptualization will provide the students with the opportunity to test their knowledge and understanding about the concepts.

DNA-The Double Helix:


In this interactive game, the students will understand how a DNA molecule is built up, how the copies of the DNA molecule made and what is the meaning of base-pairing. The job of the students in this game is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching the base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

DNA Polymerase:


In this activity students will recognize that DNA polymerase is responsible for the process of DNA replication, during which a double-stranded DNA molecule is copied into two identical DNA molecules. DNA ploymerase catalyze the polymerization of deoxyribonucleotides alongside a DNA strand, which they read and use as a template. The newly-polymerized molecule is complementary to the template strand.

DNA - The Double Helix Game:

DNA is the genetic material of all known living organisms and some viruses. DNA contains two stands wrapped around each other in a helix, and these stands are held in place by four chemicals called bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The bases pair up with each other in a specific manner to form units called base pairs - adenine always pairs with thymine, and cytosine always pairs with guanine.
In this game your job is to first make exact copies of a double-stranded DNA molecule by correctly matching base pairs to each strand, and to then determine which organism the DNA belongs to.

Nucleotides Games:

This fun game requires the students to locate and destroy the nucleotide indicated in the box at the bottom right of the screen. The students are required to select the correct molecular structure for each of the nucleotides and gain the points.

Translation: Making a protein from a messenger RNA:


The genes in DNA encode protein molecules. Expressing a gene means manufacturing its corresponding protein.Translation is the key process of making a protein from the genetic code expresses in the DNA. In translation, messenger RNA is read according to the genetic code, which relates the DNA sequence to the amino acid sequence in proteins. This virtual manipulative will allow the students to understand the process of translation. Students will also get a chance to observe, what happens when a new random mutation generates stop codons.

Protein Synthesis:

This visual tutorial of the complex biochemical process helps the student to understand the process of protein synthesis. This manipulative gives the students detailed information starting with the basics of genetic codes called codons. Next, the lesson then leads the students towards detailed information of mRNA, tRNA and rRNAs. The final phase helps students by describing the complete process of protein synthesis from initiation, to elongation and then to termination. The tutorial offers check questions at every stage to ensure students are learning the important information.

Build a GeneNetwork:


The lac operon is a set of genes which are responsible for the metabolism of lactose in some bacterial cells. Students will explore the effects of mutation within the lac operon by adding or removing genes from the DNA.

  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the various genes and DNA control elements are mutated (added or removed).
  • Predicts the effects on lactose metabolism when the concentration of lactose is changed.
  • Explain the roles of Lacl, LacZ, and LacY in lactose regulation.

The Tuberculosis Experiments and Discoveries Game:

This game explores the 1905 Novel prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for investigations and discoveries concerning the disease tuberculosis or "TB." The game is a sort of old fashioned laboratory simulation and allows students to discover and experience some of the classic methods used to detect whether a specific bacterium causes a disease.

Cancer and the Cell Cycle:

The National Institute of Health website provides a set of short animations of the cell cycle and cancer growth.

The Control of the Cell Cycle:

The Control of the Cell Cycle educational game is based on the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for discoveries concerning the control of the cell cycle.

Control of the Cell Cycle Game:

This game is about the different phases in ordinary cell division, mitosis. Between each phase there are several "check points" to make sure that nothing happened to the genetic material on the way.

Traffic Jam:

This resource poses the question, "how many vehicles might be involved in a traffic jam 12 miles long?"

This task, while involving relatively simple arithmetic, promps students to practice modeling (MP4), work with units and conversion (N-Q.1), and develop a new unit (N-Q.2). Students will also consider the appropriate level of accuracy to use in their conclusions (N-Q.3).

Felicia's Drive:

This task provides students the opportunity to make use of units to find the gas need (N-Q.1). It also requires them to make some sensible approximations (e.g., 2.92 gallons is not a good answer to part (a)) and to recognize that Felicia's situation requires her to round up. Various answers to (a) are possible, depending on how much students think is a safe amount for Felicia to have left in the tank when she arrives at the gas station. The key point is for them to explain their choices. This task provides an opportunity for students to practice MP2, Reason abstractly and quantitatively, and MP3, Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Harvesting the Fields:

This is a challenging task, suitable for extended work, and reaching into a deep understanding of units. The task requires students to exhibit MP1, Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. An algebraic solution is possible but complicated; a numerical solution is both simpler and more sophisticated, requiring skilled use of units and quantitative reasoning. Thus the task aligns with either A-CED.1 or N-Q.1, depending on the approach.

How Much is a Penny Worth?:

This task asks students to calculate the cost of materials to make a penny, utilizing rates of grams of copper.

Runners' World:

This task provides students with an opportunity to engage in Standard for Mathematical Practice 6, attending to precision. It intentionally omits some relevant information -- namely, that a typical soda can holds 12 oz of fluid, that a pound is equivalent to 16 dry ounces, and that an ounce of water weighs approximately 1.04 dry ounces (at the temperature of the human body) -- in the interest of having students discover that these are relevant quantities. The incompleteness of the problem statement makes the task more amenable to having students do work in groups.

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Weed killer:

The principal purpose of the task is to explore a real-world application problem with algebra, working with units and maintaining reasonable levels of accuracy throughout. Of particular interest is that the optimal solution for long-term purchasing of the active ingredient is achieved by purchasing bottle C, whereas minimizing total cost for a particular application comes from purchasing bottle B. Students might need the instructor's aid to see that this is just the observation that buying in bulk may not be a better deal if the extra bulk will go unused.

Fuel Efficiency:

The problem requires students to not only convert miles to kilometers and gallons to liters but they also have to deal with the added complication of finding the reciprocal at some point.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating II:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Accuracy of Carbon 14 Dating I:

This task examines, from a mathematical and statistical point of view, how scientists measure the age of organic materials by measuring the ratio of Carbon 14 to Carbon 12. The focus here is on the statistical nature of such dating.

Bus and Car:

This task operates at two levels. In part it is a simple exploration of the relationship between speed, distance, and time. Part (c) requires understanding of the idea of average speed, and gives an opportunity to address the common confusion between average speed and the average of the speeds for the two segments of the trip.

At a higher level, the task addresses N-Q.3, since realistically neither the car nor the bus is going to travel at exactly the same speed from beginning to end of each segment; there is time traveling through traffic in cities, and even on the autobahn the speed is not constant. Thus students must make judgements about the level of accuracy with which to report the result.

Calories in a Sports Drink:

This problem involves the meaning of numbers found on labels. When the level of accuracy is not given we need to make assumptions based on how the information is reported. An unexpected surprise awaits in this case, however, as no reasonable interpretation of the level of accuracy makes sense of the information reported on the bottles in parts (b) and (c). Either a miscalculation has been made or the numbers have been rounded in a very odd way.

Dinosaur Bones:

The purpose of this task is to illustrate through an absurd example the fact that in real life quantities are reported to a certain level of accuracy, and it does not make sense to treat them as having greater accuracy.

The Canoe Trip, Variation 1:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice constructing functions that represent a quantity of interest in a context, and then interpreting features of the function in the light of the context. It can be used as either an assessment or a teaching task.

The Canoe Trip, Variation 2:

The primary purpose of this task is to lead students to a numerical and graphical understanding of the behavior of a rational function near a vertical asymptote, in terms of the expression defining the function.

Average Cost:

This task asks students to find the average, write an equation, find the domain, and create a graph of the cost of producing DVDs.

How is the Weather?:

This task can be used as a quick assessment to see if students can make sense of a graph in the context of a real world situation. Students also have to pay attention to the scale on the vertical axis to find the correct match. The first and third graphs look very similar at first glance, but the function values are very different since the scales on the vertical axis are very different. The task could also be used to generate a group discussion on interpreting functions given by graphs.

Logistic Growth Model, Abstract Version:

This task is for instructional purposes only and students should already be familiar with some specific examples of logistic growth functions. The goal of this task is to have students appreciate how different constants influence the shape of a graph.

Logistic Growth Model, Explicit Version:

This problem introduces a logistic growth model in the concrete settings of estimating the population of the U.S. The model gives a surprisingly accurate estimate and this should be contrasted with linear and exponential models.

Telling a Story with Graphs:

In this task students are given graphs of quantities related to weather. The purpose of the task is to show that graphs are more than a collection of coordinate points, that they can tell a story about the variables that are involved and together they can paint a very complete picture of a situation, in this case the weather. Features in one graph, like maximum and minimum points correspond to features in another graph, for example on a rainy day the solar radiation is very low and the cumulative rainfall graph is increasing with a large slope.

Throwing Baseballs:

This task could be used for assessment or for practice. It allows the students to compare characteristics of two quadratic functions that are each represented differently, one as the graph of a quadratic function and one written out algebraically. Specifically, we are asking the students to determine which function has the greatest maximum and the greatest non-negative root.

Warming and Cooling:

This task is meant to be a straight-forward assessment task of graph reading and interpreting skills. This task helps reinforce the idea that when a variable represents time, t = 0 is chosen as an arbitrary point in time and positive times are interpreted as times that happen after that.

As the Wheel Turns:

In this task, students use trigonometric functions to model the movement of a point around a wheel and, through space. Students also interpret features of graphs in terms of the given real-world context.

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Graphs of Quadratic Functions:

Students compare graphs of different quadratic functions, then produce equations of their own to satisfy given conditions.

This exploration can be done in class near the beginning of a unit on graphing parabolas. Students need to be familiar with intercepts, and need to know what the vertex is. It is effective after students have graphed parabolas in vertex form (y=a(x–h)2+k), but have not yet explored graphing other forms.

Graphs of Power Functions:

This task requires students to recognize the graphs of different (positive) powers of x.

Archimedes and the King's Crown:

This problem solving task uses the tale of Archimedes and the King of Syracuse's crown to determine the volume and mass of gold and silver.

Eratosthenes and the circumference of the earth:

This problem solving task gives an interesting context for implementing ideas from geometry and trigonometry.

How many cells are in the human body?:

This problem solving task challenges students to apply the concepts of mass, volume, and density in the real-world context to find how many cells are in the human body.

How many leaves on a tree?:

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How many leaves on a tree? (Version 2):

This is a mathematical modeling task aimed at making a reasonable estimate for something which is too large to count accurately, the number of leaves on a tree.

How thick is a soda can? I:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the surface area of a soda can, calculate how many cubic centimeters of aluminum it contains, and estimate how thick it is.

How thick is a soda can? II:

This problem solving task asks students to explain which measurements are needed to estimate the thickness of a soda can.

Random Walk III:

The task provides a context to calculate discrete probabilities and represent them on a bar graph.

Speed Trap:

The purpose of this task is to allow students to demonstrate an ability to construct boxplots and to use boxplots as the basis for comparing distributions.

Haircut Costs:

This problem could be used as an introductory lesson to introduce group comparisons and to engage students in a question they may find amusing and interesting.

Do You Fit In This Car?:

This task requires students to use the normal distribution as a model for a data distribution. Students must use given means and standard deviations to approximate population percentages.

Should We Send Out a Certificate?:

The purpose of this task is to have students complete normal distribution calculations and to use properties of normal distributions to draw conclusions.

SAT Scores:

This problem solving task challenges students to answer probability questions about SAT scores, using distribution and mean to solve the problem.

Musical Preferences:

This problem solving task asks students to make deductions about what kind of music students like by examining a table with data.

Fitting A Line to Data:

Khan Academy tutorial video that uses Excel spreadsheet and actual income data to predict annual income and expresses
why lines and models are useful and interesting.

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.